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"Start a story by Conan Doyle and you cannot stop reading, whether you are ten or sixty." -Michael Dirda "The immense talent, passion and literary brilliance that Conan Doyle brought to his work gives him a unique place in English letters."-Stephen Fry Arthur Conan Doyle's Tales of Terror and Mystery (1922) is a haunting collection of twelve stories that highlights his extraordinary skills of storytelling. The first six stories are bloodcurdling tales of horror, and includes the macabre classic "The New Catacomb". The last six stories, closer in form to the Sherlock Holmes work, includes the…mehr

Produktbeschreibung
"Start a story by Conan Doyle and you cannot stop reading, whether you are ten or sixty." -Michael Dirda "The immense talent, passion and literary brilliance that Conan Doyle brought to his work gives him a unique place in English letters."-Stephen Fry Arthur Conan Doyle's Tales of Terror and Mystery (1922) is a haunting collection of twelve stories that highlights his extraordinary skills of storytelling. The first six stories are bloodcurdling tales of horror, and includes the macabre classic "The New Catacomb". The last six stories, closer in form to the Sherlock Holmes work, includes the classic railroad mystery, "The Lost Special". One of the stand-out works in the entire collection is "The Horror of the Heights"; in a story that straddles both the science fiction and horror genres, the journals of a missing pilot reveal the existence of terrifying creatures that lurk in the upper atmosphere. "The New Catacomb", in Doyle's tribute to Edgar Allan Poe, tells the revenge story of two rival archeologists as they sink deeper into an endless Roman catacomb. In the evocative story "The Lost Special", a train has mysteriously disappeared without trace between two stations. When the only evidence of the enigma is the dead body of the locomotive driver, the local newspaper becomes a platform to solve the mystery. The intrigue of speculation and reasoning is on par with the best of the Sherlock Holmes adventures. Tense, disturbing, and dark, these stories will keep readers captivated until the final page. Other stories included are: "The Leather Funnel", "The Case of Lady Sannox", "The Terror of Blue John Gap", "The Brazilian Cat", "The Beetle-Hunter", "The Man with the Watches", "The Japanned Box", "The Black Doctor", and "The Jew's Breastplate". With an eye-catching new cover, and professionally typeset manuscript, this edition of Tales of Terror and Mystery is both modern and readable.
Autorenporträt
Sir Arthur Ignatius Conan Doyle KStJ DL (22 May 1859 - 7 July 1930) was a British writer best known for his detective fiction featuring the character Sherlock Holmes. Originally a physician, in 1887 he published A Study in Scarlet, the first of four novels and more than fifty short stories about Holmes and Dr. Watson. The Sherlock Holmes stories are generally considered milestones in the field of crime fiction. Doyle was a prolific writer; his non-Sherlockian works include fantasy and science fiction stories about Professor Challenger and humorous stories about the Napoleonic soldier Brigadier Gerard, as well as plays, romances, poetry, non-fiction and historical novels. One of Doyle's early short stories, "J. Habakuk Jephson's Statement", helped to popularise the mystery of the Mary Celeste. Doyle is often referred to as Sir Arthur Conan Doyle or simply Conan Doyle (implying that "Conan" is part of a compound surname as opposed to his given middle name). His baptism entry in the register of St Mary's Cathedral, Edinburgh, gives "Arthur Ignatius Conan" as his given names and "Doyle" as his surname. It also names Michael Conan as his godfather.[1] The cataloguers of the British Libraryand the Library of Congress treat "Doyle" alone as his surname. Steven Doyle, editor of The Baker Street Journal, wrote, "Conan was Arthur's middle name. Shortly after he graduated from high school he began using Conan as a sort of surname. But technically his last name is simply 'Doyle'."[3] When knighted, he was gazetted as Doyle, not under the compound Conan Doyle Doyle was born on 22 May 1859 at 11 Picardy Place, Edinburgh, Scotland. His father, Charles Altamont Doyle, was born in England, of Irish Catholic descent, and his mother, Mary (née Foley), was Irish Catholic. His parents married in 1855.[7] In 1864 the family dispersed because of Charles's growing alcoholism, and the children were temporarily housed across Edinburgh. In 1867, the family came together again and lived in squalid tenement flats at 3 Sciennes Place.[8] Doyle's father died in 1893, in the Crichton Royal, Dumfries, after many years of psychiatric illness.