Statt 105,99 €**
34,99 €
versandkostenfrei*

inkl. MwSt.
**Früherer Preis
Sofort lieferbar
17 °P sammeln
  • Gebundenes Buch

Exploiting econometric techniques aimed at dealing with the dynamics of economic systems and the heterogeneity of agents performances, the volume integrates innovation-based reasoning with ex-post analyses, and presents ex-ante analyses able to evaluate the role of climate change policies by using computable general equilibrium models such as the Global Trade Analysis Project for Energy (GTAP-E). The authors merge and use a range of datasets, including OECD-PATSTAT and STAN, to test novel techniques informed by evolutionary economic theories and the Porter hypothesis. The immediate relevance…mehr

Produktbeschreibung
Exploiting econometric techniques aimed at dealing with the dynamics of economic systems and the heterogeneity of agents performances, the volume integrates innovation-based reasoning with ex-post analyses, and presents ex-ante analyses able to evaluate the role of climate change policies by using computable general equilibrium models such as the Global Trade Analysis Project for Energy (GTAP-E). The authors merge and use a range of datasets, including OECD-PATSTAT and STAN, to test novel techniques informed by evolutionary economic theories and the Porter hypothesis. The immediate relevance and applicability of the models will strengthen the hand of policy analysts for whom the dynamic efficiency of environmental policy is a new, high-profile evaluation criterion. This book looks for responses to the need for more complex dynamic reasoning in environmental economics by developing a series of both theoretical and empirical integrated approaches. The quartet of core and interlinked issues addressed are central to the requirements of policy makers and scholars who require robust methodologies for assessing the role played by innovation and environmental policy in determining economic performance. The volume examines the potential alternative uses of recently available hybrid economic-environmental accounting at meso-level, both for ex-ante and ex-post analysis. It studies the deployment of dynamics to explain the co-evolution of economic and environmental systems. The authors also explore how technological innovation drives sustainability goals, and demonstrate the importance of working at sector level rather than at aggregated national level.
Exploiting econometric techniques aimed at dealing with the dynamics of economic systems and the heterogeneity of agents performances, the volume integrates innovation-based reasoning with ex-post analyses, and presents ex-ante analyses able to evaluate the role of climate change policies by using computable general equilibrium models such as the Global Trade Analysis Project for Energy (GTAP-E). The authors merge and use a range of datasets, including OECD-PATSTAT and STAN, to test novel techniques informed by evolutionary economic theories and the Porter hypothesis. The immediate relevance and applicability of the models will strengthen the hand of policy analysts for whom the dynamic efficiency of environmental policy is a new, high-profile evaluation criterion.
  • Produktdetails
  • Verlag: Springer / Springer Netherlands
  • Artikelnr. des Verlages: 86122891
  • Erscheinungstermin: November 2012
  • Englisch
  • Abmessung: 241mm x 160mm x 18mm
  • Gewicht: 548g
  • ISBN-13: 9789400750883
  • ISBN-10: 9400750889
  • Artikelnr.: 35980718
Inhaltsangabe
Introduction

VALERIA COSTANTINI AND MASSIMILIANO MAZZANTI

PART I

Modelling Macroeconomic Scenarios: Energy Issues, Economic Performances and Environmental Policy

1 The GTAP-E: Model Description and Improvements

ALESSANDRO ANTIMIANI, VALERIA COSTANTINI, CHIARA MARTINI, ALESSANDRO PALMA AND MARIA CRISTINA TOMMASINO

1.1 Introduction

1.2 Bottom-Up and Top-Down Models

1.3 The GTAP Model

1.3.1 An Overview

1.3.2 The GTAP Database

1.3.3 Model Structure

1.4 The GTAP-E Model

1.4.1 Production Structure

1.4.2 Consumption Structure

1.4.3 CO2 Emissions and Related Parameters

1.4.4 The GTAP-E Revised Version

1.5 Model Improvements

1.5.1 CO2 Emissions Data Calibration

1.5.2 Updated Substitution Elasticities in the Capital-Energy Nest

1.5.3 Model Setting and Baseline

1.6 Conclusions and Future Research Steps

References

2 Carbon Leakage and Trade Adjustment Policies

ALESSANDRO ANTIMIANI, VALERIA COSTANTINI, CHIARA MARTINI, LUCA SALVATICI AND MARIA CRISTINA TOMMASINO

2.1 Introduction

2.2 Carbon Leakage as a Side Effect of Climate Policies

2.2.1 A Definition of Carbon Leakage

2.2.2 How to Design Carbon Border Tax Adjustments

2.3 Scenario Setting

2.4 Empirical Results

2.5 Conclusions

References

3 Theoretical Approaches to Dynamic Efficiency in Policy Contexts. The Case of Renewable Electricity

PABLO DEL RÌO AND MERCEDES BLEDA

3.1 Introduction

3.2 Theoretical Approaches to Analysis of Innovation Effects of RES-E Support

3.2.1 The Traditional Economics Perspective

3.2.2 The Systems of Innovation Perspective

3.2.3 The Literature On Learning Effects

3.3 Combining Different Perspectives: Points of Complementarity and Conflict

3.4 Conclusions

References

4 Energy Efficiency Policy in the US: The Impact of the Industrial Assessment Centres (IAC) Programme and State and Regional Climate Policy Actions

LUIS MARIA ABADIE, RAMON ARIGONI ORTIZ, IBON GALARRAGA AND ANIL MARKANDYA

4.1 Introduction

4.2 Determinants of Investments in Energy Efficiency

4.2.1 Investment Decision: Previous Evidence

4.2.2 The IAC Database 2011

4.2.3 The Decision Concerning Energy Efficiency Investment in the IAC Programme

4.3 Impact of the IAC Programme and the US EPA State and Regional Climate Policies

4.3.1 Panel Data of Emissions

4.3.2 The State and Regional Climate Policy Actions

4.3.3 Estimations

4.4 Conclusions

References

Appendix

5 Porter Reloaded: The Role and Effectiveness of Environmental and Social Regulations for Realizing Innovation offsets and Enhancing Firm Competitiveness

MARCUS WAGNER

5.1 Introduction

5.2 Development of Research Questions

5.3 Data and Methods

5.4 Results

5.4.1 Case Based Analysis

5.4.2 Survey Analysis

5.5 Conclusions

References

PART II

Environmental Innovation and Competitiveness: Linking Micro, Meso and Macro Analysis in the Dynamics

6 Implications of Policy Uncertainty for Innovation in Environmental Technologies. The Case of Public R&D Budgets

MARGARITA KALAMOVA, NICK JOHNSTONE AND IVAN HASCIC

6.1 Introduction

6.2 Policy Uncertainty and Investment Irreversibility

6.3 Hypothesis

6.4 Data and Empirical Analysis

6.5 Conclusions and Policy Implications

References

Appendix

7 Eco-Activity and Innovativeness: What is Their Relation to Environmental Performance in Consumer Firms and Industrial Firms?

RENE KEMP AND NICOLINE OEHME

7.1 Introduction

7.2 Sample

7.3 Analysis of Environmental Performance and Innovativeness

7.4 Analysis of Non-Environmental Social and Environmental Performance

7.5 Conclusions

References

Appendix

8 Environmental Policy and Induced Technological Change in European Industries

FRANCESCO CRESPI

8.1 Introduction

8.2 Theoretical Background and Empirical Issues

8.3 Data Description

8.4 The Econometric Model

8.5 Empirical Results

8.6 Conclusions

References

9 Closing the Gap? Dynamic Analyses of Emission Efficiency and Sector Productivity in Europe

GIOVANNI MARIN

9.1 Introduction

9.2 The Empirical Model

9.3 Dataset Description

9.4 Empirical Results

9.5 Conclusions

References

Appendix

10 Waste Technology Inventions and Policy Effects in Dynamic Settings. Evidence from OECD Patent Data

FRANCESCO NICOLLI

10.1 Introduction

10.2 Waste, Environmental Policies and Technological Innovation

10.3 Research Hypothesis, Data and Methodology

10.3.1 Patent Data

10.3.2 Relevant Policies

10.3.3 Other Explanatory Variables

10.4 Empirical Results

10.5 Conclusions

References

11 Biopat: An Investigation Tool for Analysis of Industry Evolution, Technological Paths and Policy Impact in the Biofuels Sector

VALERIA COSTANTINI, FRANCESCO CRESPI AND YLENIA CURCI

11.1 Introduction

11.2 The IPC System and the Green Inventory Database

11.3 The Biopat Methodology

11.4 Database Structure and Preliminary Descriptive Statistics

11.5 Conclusions

References

Appendix

Index