'The Riddle of Creation' - Wehlau, Ruth C.
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The Creation is one of the most important themes in Old English poetry. The Riddle of Creation approaches the Creation through its metaphors, focussing especially on images relating to architecture and the body. These are shown to form organized structures extending throughout the poetry, structures which are ironically inverted in the Exeter Book riddles. Overall, these metaphors reveal not only Anglo-Saxon notions about the created world, but fundamental concepts about the nature of poetic creation as well.…mehr

Produktbeschreibung
The Creation is one of the most important themes in Old English poetry. The Riddle of Creation approaches the Creation through its metaphors, focussing especially on images relating to architecture and the body. These are shown to form organized structures extending throughout the poetry, structures which are ironically inverted in the Exeter Book riddles. Overall, these metaphors reveal not only Anglo-Saxon notions about the created world, but fundamental concepts about the nature of poetic creation as well.
  • Produktdetails
  • Studies in the Humanities .24
  • Verlag: Peter Lang Ltd. International Academic Publishers
  • Artikelnr. des Verlages: .62897, 62897
  • Neuausg.
  • Erscheinungstermin: 1. April 1997
  • Englisch
  • Abmessung: 236mm x 156mm x 17mm
  • Gewicht: 410g
  • ISBN-13: 9780820428970
  • ISBN-10: 0820428973
  • Artikelnr.: 24519959
Autorenporträt
The Author: Ruth Wehlau holds a Ph.D. from the Centre for Medieval Studies at the University of Toronto, and is currently teaching at York University, Toronto, and Concordia University, Montreal. She has published articles on Old English poetry.
Rezensionen
"Ruth Wehlau is very alive to the metaphorical identities and resonances in Old English poems. Her book is an illuminating study of key images of Creation, architecture, individual and social bodies, and poetic creation - as these images exert metaphorical force in particular poems and as they reach out to structure and inform the larger body of Old English poetry." (Alvin A. Lee, McMaster University)