-40%
8,95 €
Statt 14,99 €**
8,95 €
inkl. MwSt.
**Preis der gedruckten Ausgabe (Broschiertes Buch)
Sofort per Download lieferbar
Versandkostenfrei*
4 °P sammeln
-40%
8,95 €
Statt 14,99 €**
8,95 €
inkl. MwSt.
**Preis der gedruckten Ausgabe (Broschiertes Buch)
Sofort per Download lieferbar
Versandkostenfrei*

Alle Infos zum eBook verschenken
4 °P sammeln
Als Download kaufen
Statt 14,99 €**
-40%
8,95 €
inkl. MwSt.
**Preis der gedruckten Ausgabe (Broschiertes Buch)
Sofort per Download lieferbar
4 °P sammeln
Jetzt verschenken
Statt 14,99 €**
-40%
8,95 €
inkl. MwSt.
**Preis der gedruckten Ausgabe (Broschiertes Buch)
Sofort per Download lieferbar

Alle Infos zum eBook verschenken
4 °P sammeln
  • Format: ePub


Propelled by the same superb instinct for storytelling that made The Kite Runner a beloved classic, A Thousand Splendid Suns is at once an incredible chronicle of thirty years of Afghan history and a deeply moving story of family, friendship, faith, and the salvation to be found in love. After 103 weeks on the New York Times bestseller list and with four million copies of The Kite Runner shipped, Khaled Hosseini returns with a beautiful, riveting, and haunting novel that confirms his place as one of the most important literary writers today. Born a generation apart and with very different…mehr

  • Geräte: eReader
  • mit Kopierschutz
  • eBook Hilfe
  • Größe: 0.87MB
  • FamilySharing(5)
Produktbeschreibung
Propelled by the same superb instinct for storytelling that made The Kite Runner a beloved classic, A Thousand Splendid Suns is at once an incredible chronicle of thirty years of Afghan history and a deeply moving story of family, friendship, faith, and the salvation to be found in love. After 103 weeks on the New York Times bestseller list and with four million copies of The Kite Runner shipped, Khaled Hosseini returns with a beautiful, riveting, and haunting novel that confirms his place as one of the most important literary writers today. Born a generation apart and with very different ideas about love and family, Mariam and Laila are two women brought jarringly together by war, by loss and by fate. As they endure the ever escalating dangers around them-in their home as well as in the streets of Kabul-they come to form a bond that makes them both sisters and mother-daughter to each other, and that will ultimately alter the course not just of their own lives but of the next generation. With heart-wrenching power and suspense, Hosseini shows how a woman's love for her family can move her to shocking and heroic acts of self-sacrifice, and that in the end it is love, or even the memory of love, that is often the key to survival.

A stunning accomplishment, A Thousand Splendid Suns is a haunting, heartbreaking, compelling story of an unforgiving time, an unlikely friendship, and an indestructible love.


Dieser Download kann aus rechtlichen Gründen nur mit Rechnungsadresse in A, B, BG, CY, CZ, D, DK, EW, E, FIN, F, GR, HR, H, I, LT, L, LR, M, NL, PL, P, R, S, SLO, SK ausgeliefert werden.

  • Produktdetails
  • Verlag: Penguin Publishing Group
  • Seitenzahl: 432
  • Erscheinungstermin: 25.11.2008
  • Englisch
  • ISBN-13: 9781101010907
  • Artikelnr.: 42975116
Autorenporträt
Khaled Hosseini wurde 1965 als ältestes von fünf Kindern in Kabul geboren. Der Vater war Diplomat, die Mutter Lehrerin. 1976 führte der Beruf des Vaters die Familie nach Paris. Zum Zeitpunkt der geplanten Rückkehr 1980 tobte in Afghanistan bereits der Krieg gegen die sowjetischen Invasoren, und die Familie erhielt in den USA politisches Asyl.
Khaled wurde Arzt und lebt bis heute mit Frau und zwei Kindern in Kalifornien. Mit seinem ersten Roman "Drachenläufer" wollte er der westlichen Welt das Afghanistan näher bringen, wie es bis zum Einmarsch der Roten Armee, vor den Taliban und dem Krieg war. Das Buch wurde zum weltweiten Bestseller und mit großem Erfolg verfilmt. Hosseinis zweiter Roman, "Tausend strahlende Sonnen", stellt zwei mutige Frauen in den Mittelpunkt, die gemeinsam gegen das ihnen vorbestimmte Schicksal kämpfen.

Das meint die buecher.de-Redaktion: Khaled Hosseini berührt Millionen Menschen mit den Geschichten aus "seinem" Afghanistan - leidenschaftlich, liebevoll und hochspannend.
Rezensionen
A Thousand Splendid Suns is an ambitious work. Once again the setting is Afghanistan, but this time [Hosseini] has taken the last 33 years of that country s tumultuous history of war and oppression and told it on an intimate scale, through the lives of two women. The New York Times

Spectacular. . . . Hosseini s writing makes our hearts ache, our stomachs clench and our emotions reel. . . . Hosseini mixes the experiences of these women with imagined scenarios to create a fascinating microcosm of Afghan family life. He shows us the interior lives of the anonymous women living beneath identity-diminishing burqas... Hosseini writes in gorgeous and stirring language of the natural beauty and colorful cultural heritage of his native Afghanistan. . . . Hosseini tells this saddest of stories in achingly beautiful prose through stunningly heroic characters whose spirits somehow grasp the dimmest rays of hope. USA Today

Just as good, if not better, than Hosseini s best-selling first book, The Kite Runner Newsweek

Compelling New York Magazine

Hosseini revisits Afghanistan for a compelling story that gives voice to the agonies and hopes of another group of innocents caught up in a war. . . . Mesmerizing . . . A Thousand Splendid Suns is the painful, and at times violent, yet ultimately hopeful story of two women s inner lives. Hosseini s bewitching narrative captures the intimate details of life in a world where it s a struggle to survive, skillfully inserting this human story into the larger backdrop of recent history. San Francisco Chronicle

Hosseini . . . has followed his debut novel with another work of strong storytelling and engaging characters. . . . The story pulses with life. . . . Khaled Hosseini is simply a marvelously moving storyteller. San Jose Mercury News

Hosseini s story . . . rings true as a universal story about victims of cruelty and those who lack the most fundamental of human rights. . . . Hosseini s work is uplifting, enlightening, universal. The author s love for his characters and for his country is palpable. In the end, A Thousand Splendid Suns is a love letter to a country and to a people. It is a celebration of endurance and survival in the face of unspeakable tragedy. This is a love song to anyone who has ever had a broken heart and to anyone who has ever felt powerless and yet still dares to dream. And yes, Hosseini has done it again. Fort Worth Star-Telegram

The novel is beautifully written with descriptive details that will haunt you long after you finish reading it. Dallas Morning News

This [novel] tells the startling story of domestic adversaries who discover that survival in a horrific world is nearly impossible without compassion, love and solidarity. . . Hosseini s prose . . . can stun a reader with its powerful, haunting images. Atlanta Journal-Constitution

Absolutely compelling on every level. It s nearly impossible for a novel a work of fantasy and fabrication to deliver a formidable blow, a pounding of the senses, a reeling so staggering that we are convinced the characters and their dilemmas are genuine. Such a persuasion is particularly difficult when the setting is Afghanistan, a country and culture many see as too strange for recognition, for empathy. But that s what Khaled Hosseini does again and again with A Thousand Splendid Suns. Chicago Sun-Times

Hosseini has the storytelling gift . . . [A Thousand Splendid Suns] offers us the sweep of historic upheavals narrated with the intimacy of family and village life. . . . What keeps this novel vivid and compelling are Hosseini s eye for the textures of daily life and his ability to portray a full range of human emotions, from the smoldering rage of an abused wife to the early flutters of maternal love when a woman discovers she is carrying a baby. . . . Hosseini s illuminating book [is] a worthy sequel to The Kite Runner. Los Angeles Times

Many of us learned much from The Kite Runner. There is much more to be learned from A Thousand Splendid Suns . . . a brave, honorable, big-hearted book The Washington Post Book World

The author s fans won t be disappointed with A Thousand Splendid Suns if anything, this book shows at even better advantage Hosseini s storytelling gifts. New York Daily News

Hosseini has created two enormously winning female characters in Mariam and Laila, Afghan women born into very different circumstances but who have the same problems. Minneapolis Star-Tribune

[Hosseini] is a writer of unique sensitivities. . . . Hosseini embraces an old-fashioned storytelling unconcerned with literary hipness, unafraid of sentimentality, unworried about the sort of Dickensian coincidences that most contemporary American writers consider off-limits. . . . We are lucky . . . to have a writer of Hosseini s storytelling ambitions interpreting his culture and history for us with another large-hearted novel. . . . Despite the unjust cruelties of our world, the heroines of A Thousand Splendid Suns do endure, both on the page and in our imagination. Miami Herald

…mehr
In case you're wondering whether A Thousand Splendid Suns is as good as The Kite Runner, here's the answer: No. It's better Washington Post

Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung - Rezension
Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung | Besprechung von 24.09.2007

Frauen können nicht fliehen
Wehret den Taliban: Khaled Hosseinis Afghanistan-Roman

Was passiert, wenn die Taliban zurückkehren, steht in diesem Roman, "Tausend strahlende Sonnen". Außenminister Steinmeier empfiehlt ihn deshalb den Kritikern des Afghanistan-Einsatzes der Bundeswehr zur Lektüre. Gregor Gysi sagt: "Eine Unverschämtheit!"

Die Burka ist kein bequemes Kleidungsstück. Die für die meisten Frauen Afghanistans heute obligatorische Ganzkörperverhüllung schneidet an den Schläfen ein, ständig tritt man auf den Saum, und, was am schlimmsten ist: Durch die Gaze, hinter der sogar die Augen verborgen sind, lässt sich die Welt nur undeutlich erkennen. Im Kabul der Taliban wurden sogar die wenigen Ärztinnen, die noch praktizieren durften, gezwungen, mit Burka zu operieren, ganz abgesehen davon, dass die sanitären und medizinischen Bedingungen, unter denen sie dies taten, erbärmlich waren. So wurde ein Kaiserschnitt ohne Narkose nicht nur für Mutter und Kind, sondern auch für die Ärztin, die sich hinter den Türen des Operationssaales gesetzeswidrig der Verschleierung entledigte, um ihre Arbeit zu tun, zum Risiko. Und wehe, das Kind war ein Mädchen.

Bei der Lektüre des neuen Romans des 1965 in Kabul geborenen Khaled Hosseini überkommt sicher nicht nur Leserinnen mehr als einmal Dankbarkeit für die Gnade einer westlichen Geburt. Wie bereits in seinem zum Bestseller gewordenen und inzwischen verfilmten literarischen Debüt "Der Drachenläufer" (2003) erzählt der seit 1980 im amerikanischen Exil lebende Autor und Arzt von tragischen Schicksalen in seiner Heimat in den vergangenen vier Jahrzehnten - dem Ende der Monarchie, der Invasion der Sowjets und dem darauf folgenden Bürgerkrieg, der in die Herrschaft der Taliban mündete. Standen im ersten Roman Männer und die Frage nach Schuld und Sühne im Mittelpunkt, so widmet Hosseini sein neues Buch ganz den Frauen seines Landes, die Willensstärke und weibliche Solidarität der männlichen Gewalt, dem Elend und politischen Unbilden entgegensetzen. Ging es bei den Männern im "Drachenläufer" um Verrat und Feigheit, so geht es bei den Frauen um das Gegenteil - Loyalität, Vertrauen und Mut. Auch diesmal scheut Hosseini nicht vor starken Polarisierungen, zuweilen eindimensionalen Charakteren und einem Handlungsstrang zurück, der kein Auge trocken lässt und alle Register von Herz, Schmerz und Spannung zieht, um am Ende dennoch eine bewegende, der Kolportage relativ unverdächtige Familiengeschichte zu schreiben, der eine große Leserschaft gewiss sein dürfte. Zwischen den Zeilen ist zu spüren, dass hier ein Autor mit einer Mission schreibt, mit dem Bewusstsein, dem durch globale Medien auf Terrorismus und Krieg reduzierten Bild seiner Heimat im Westen etwas entgegenzusetzen, das die Tragödie, die das Land seit fast dreißig Jahren erleidet, glaubhaft verkörpert.

Das menschliche Antlitz Afghanistans trägt Burka und ist weiblich. Genau genommen sind es zwei Gesichter, zwei Protagonistinnen, die ungleicher nicht sein könnten. Mariam gilt in der afghanischen Gesellschaft als uneheliche Tochter einer Dienstmagd und eines reichen Geschäftsmannes als Paria. Mit ihrer verbitterten, unter Epilepsie leidenden Mutter lebt sie in einer bescheidenen Hütte vor den Toren der einstigen Dichterstadt Herat. Der Krieg, die Sowjets, die Taliban, das alles ist noch in weiter Ferne. Der Vater kümmert sich halbherzig, liebt das Mädchen einerseits, versteckt es jedoch andererseits vor seiner Familie - drei rechtmäßigen Frauen und ihren neun Kindern. Als Mariam sich eines Tages eigenständig auf den Weg zu ihm macht, begeht die Mutter Selbstmord, der Vater verheiratet die Fünfzehnjährige kurzerhand mit dem dreißig Jahre älteren, verwitweten Schuhmacher Rashid aus Kabul, der sich schon bald zum Haustyrannen entwickelt, zumal ihm seine junge Frau auch nach Jahren keinen Stammhalter schenkt.

Laila, Mariams Nachbarin, ist die schöne, selbstbewusste und behütete Tochter eines Kabuler Lehrers, sie geht zur Schule und hegt Karriereambitionen, die ihr auch von ihrer Jugendliebe gern zugestanden werden. Der Krieg macht sie über Nacht zur Waise: Nach dem Tod der älteren Brüder im Kampf gegen die Sowjets sterben eines Nachts auch die Eltern bei einem Bombardement der inzwischen verfeindeten Mudschahedin. Der Liebste ist bereits mit seinen Eltern nach Pakistan geflohen, und so nimmt sie, die schwanger ist, das Angebot Rashids an, seine zweite Frau zu werden, weiß sie doch, dass sie allein als Frau mit einem unehelichen Kind in Kabul nicht überleben würde und dass sie Rashid gerade noch glauben machen kann, das Kind sei sein eigenes. Die folgenden Jahre der Entbehrungen schweißen die beiden anfänglich rivalisierenden Frauen zu einer Schicksalsgemeinschaft zusammen, an deren Ende sich die eine heroisch für die andere opfern wird.

Es ist nicht so sehr die spannend geschriebene Geschichte selbst, sondern der Detailreichtum aus dem Alltagsleben in Kabul, der berührt: die Beschreibung eines Waisenhauses in der kriegszerstörten, hungernden Stadt, in der ein mutiger Leiter die Kinder, darunter auch Mädchen, nicht nur in Religion unterrichtet (die Szenen kennt man allerdings schon aus dem ersten Buch); die Schilderung eines "Titanic"-Fiebers, das die Menschen dazu bringt, plötzlich unter Gefahr ihre in den Hinterhöfen verscharrten Videorekorder und Fernseher auszugraben, um hinter verdunkelten Fenstern gebannt die Raubkopien des Hollywood-Melodramas anzusehen, wiewohl doch der eigene Überlebenskampf die Dramatik der Schnulze weit übertrifft.

Man ist sprachlos über die Brutalität eines Ehemannes, der über zu harten Reis klagt und seiner Frau befiehlt, als Strafe Steine zu kauen, worauf sie Zähne und Blut spuckt. Ein Gang auf den Markt, selbst in männlicher Begleitung, kann gefährlich werden, wenn nicht der Mann, sondern die Frau den schwerhörigen Händler zu laut nach dem Preis fragt; Frauen dürfen ihre Stimme nicht erheben, sie dürfen ohne männliche Begleitung keinen Bus besteigen (und können somit nicht fliehen), und wenn die Witwen, die wie alle Frauen nicht arbeiten dürfen, ihre Kinder notgedrungen in ein Waisenhaus geben, um diese vor dem Hungertod zu bewahren, so ist ein Besuch der eigenen Kinder nicht nur wegen der Schießereien und Bombardements lebensgefährlich. Die Schilderung des Frauengefängnisses von Kabul, in dem eine Hauptfigur landet, gehört zu den am tiefsten unter die Haut gehenden Passagen des Buches; man fragt sich, wie es in diesem Gefängnis im heutigen Afghanistan wohl aussehen mag. Mariams Mutter hat ihrer Tochter einen düsteren afghanischen Spruch mit auf den Lebensweg gegeben: "So wie eine Kompassnadel immer nach Norden zeigt, wird der anklagende Finger eines Mannes immer eine Frau finden. Immer!"

Dagegen setzt Khaled Hosseini Optimismus. Sein Buch hat er einer dritten Heldin gewidmet, der Stadt Kabul. Der Titel ist einem Poem des persischen Dichters Saib-e-Tabrizi entnommen, das die Schönheit der Stadt preist. Das allzu glückselige und deshalb nicht wirklich überzeugende Ende des Buches führt die Reste der Patchworkfamilie nach einer Odyssee dann auch zurück nach Kabul, wo die Menschen im Frühjahr 2003 Blumen in leeren Granathülsen pflanzen - Raketenblumen werden sie genannt.

SABINE BERKING

Khaled Hosseini: "Tausend strahlende Sonnen". Roman. Aus dem Englischen übersetzt von Michael Windgassen. Verlag Bloomsbury, Berlin 2007. 380 S., geb., 22,- [Euro].

Alle Rechte vorbehalten. © F.A.Z. GmbH, Frankfurt am Main
…mehr

Süddeutsche Zeitung - Rezension
Süddeutsche Zeitung | Besprechung von 21.09.2007

Weiblicher Kreuzweg
Khaled Hosseinis neuer Roman „Tausend strahlende Sonnen”
Ach, der Orient! Er ist auch nicht mehr das, was er einmal war, zumindest nicht in unseren westlichen Köpfen. Von der Salonmalerei des 19. Jahrhunderts über die Abenteuer Kara Ben Nemsis und Rudolph Valentinos Starruhm als feuriger Scheich bis zu den zahllosen Schlagzeilen, die Soraya und Farah Diba gewidmet waren, reicht eine lückenlose Kette der Phantasmen. Exotik reimt sich in ihnen auf Erotik, und die Märchen aus 1001 Nacht sind nie allzu fern. Die iranische Revolution, mehr aber noch Betty Mahmoodys Bestseller „Nicht ohne meine Tochter” und die Ereignisse von 9/11 haben diese Tradition vorerst abreißen lassen. Die neuen Bilder, die kursieren, sind zwar ebenso obsessiv wie die alten, aber wesentlich dramatischer. Sie unterscheiden sich von ihren Vorgängern ungefähr wie ein Splatter Movie von einem Mantel-und-Degen-Film. Islamistische Terroristen, rabiate Ehemänner, leidende Frauen – auf solchen shock values beruht heute die populäre Faszination des Orients.
Ein Leben in Würde
Auch „Tausend strahlende Sonnen” erzählt von einem weiblichen Kreuzweg. Mariam kommt als uneheliche Tochter eines vermögenden Geschäftsmannes in der afghanischen Provinz zur Welt. Kaum hat sie ihre Pubertät erreicht, wird sie, um die Schande ihres Vaters vergessen zu machen, mit Raschid, einem wesentlich älteren Schuhmacher aus Kabul, verheiratet. Eine Reihe von Fehlgeburten führt dazu, dass sie die Gunst ihres Mannes nach und nach völlig verliert. Nach zwei Jahrzehnten einer unerträglichen Ehe muss sie zudem tolerieren, dass Raschid sich eine weitere Frau zulegt: die halbwüchsige Laila, die ihre Eltern bei einem Raketenangriff verloren hat. Mariam hasst ihre Konkurrentin zunächst, freundet sich dann aber mit ihr an. Gemeinsam nehmen die beiden Frauen den nahezu aussichtslosen Kampf um ein Leben in Würde auf.
In seiner Schilderung islamisch-patriarchalischer Gewalttaten fügt „Tausend strahlende Sonnen” sich ohne Umschweife in den inzwischen etablierten Gruselkanon ein. Neben der differenzierten Schilderung des schwierigen Verhältnisses Mariams zu ihren Eltern besticht der Roman aber, wenn er subtile Formen männlichen Machtmissbrauchs beschreibt. So verbietet Raschid seiner Frau, sich den männlichen Gästen ihres Hauses zu zeigen. Zunächst ist ihr dies nicht unrecht: „Im Gegenteil, sie fühlte sich geschmeichelt. Für Raschid war das, was sie miteinander gemein hatten, heilig. Er hielt ihre Ehre, ihren namoos, für schützenswert und vermittelte ihr damit das Gefühl, etwas Kostbares, Bedeutendes zu sein.” Schläge und Drohungen sind, wie der Autor zu zeigen versteht, nur ein Mittel der Unterdrückung unter anderen; ebenso wirkungsvoll ist der systematisch geförderte Mangel weiblichen Selbstwertgefühls.
Starrsinn und Scheinmoral
Mit „Drachenläufer”, seinem ersten Roman, ist Khaled Hosseini vor vier Jahren ein Welterfolg gelungen. Hinter seinem aktuellen Werk, dem drei Jahrzehnte unruhiger und fast immer gewalttätiger afghanischer Geschichte als Folie dienen, lässt sich ein pragmatisch-humanitäres Motiv erkennen: Der Autor, der in Kabul aufgewachsen ist und heute als Arzt und Gesandter des Flüchtlingshilfswerkes der Vereinten Nationen in Kalifornien lebt, will ein wenig mehr über seine ferne, fremde Heimat mitteilen, als sich aus den Meldungen des Tages erfahren lässt. Anflüge von Ironie ob des Starrsinns und der Scheinmoral, die seine Landsleute kultivieren, sind ihm dabei nicht fremd. „Laila, mein Liebe”, lässt er an einer Stelle deren Vater sagen, „der einzige Feind, den ein Afghane niemals wird bezwingen können, ist niemand anderes als er selbst.” CHRISTOPH HAAS
KHALED HOSSEINI: Tausend strahlende Sonnen. Aus dem Amerikanischen von Kai Windgassen. Bloomsbury Berlin Verlag, Berlin 2007. 384 Seiten, 22 Euro.
SZdigital: Alle Rechte vorbehalten – Süddeutsche Zeitung GmbH, München
Eine Dienstleistung der DIZ München GmbH
…mehr