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Although normally thought of as a sex hormone, recent research has highlighted the numerous and significant effects that oestrogen has on the CNS, extending far beyond its important reproductive role. It has been shown that oestrogen acts as a neural growth factor with important influences on the survival, plasticity, regeneration and ageing of the mammalian brain.
This exciting book brings together leading clinicians and researchers to discuss oestrogen's basic mechanisms of action, the extrahypothalmic brain regions it affects, and its influence on cognitive functions in animals and
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Produktbeschreibung
Although normally thought of as a sex hormone, recent research has highlighted the numerous and significant effects that oestrogen has on the CNS, extending far beyond its important reproductive role. It has been shown that oestrogen acts as a neural growth factor with important influences on the survival, plasticity, regeneration and ageing of the mammalian brain.

This exciting book brings together leading clinicians and researchers to discuss oestrogen's basic mechanisms of action, the extrahypothalmic brain regions it affects, and its influence on cognitive functions in animals and humans. Finally, recent research on the role of oestrogens in ageing and dementia, including the significance of oestrogen action in Alzheimer's disease, is discussed. The 15 papers contained in this book, together with the extensive discussion sessions that follow them, reveal much new and exciting work in this area, and identify promising new research directions.
Dieser Band gehört zur renommierten Reihe "Novartis Foundation Series". Er gibt einen Überblick über die jüngsten Erkenntnisse der neuronalen Wirkungen von Östrogenen. Diskutiert werden die Grundmechanismen der Östrogenwirkung, die extra-hypothalmischen Gehirnsysteme, die von Östrogenen beeinflußt werden sowie Östrogene in Verbindung mit ihrer kognitiven Funktion und ihrer Rolle bei der Neuroprotektion. Enthalten sind Beiträge international führender Experten auf diesem Gebiet, die das Thema anhand aktuellster Forschungsergebnisse umfassend behandeln. (y05/00)
  • Produktdetails
  • Verlag: John Wiley & Sons / Wiley, John, & Sons, Inc
  • Seitenzahl: 296
  • Erscheinungstermin: 2. August 2000
  • Englisch
  • Abmessung: 229mm x 152mm x 22mm
  • Gewicht: 606g
  • ISBN-13: 9780471492030
  • ISBN-10: 0471492035
  • Artikelnr.: 09398275
Inhaltsangabe
Chairman's Introduction (B. McEwen). Mechanism of Oestrogen Signalling with Particular Reference to the Role of ERß in the Central Nervous System (E. Treuter
et al.). Oestrogen Receptor Function at Classical and Alternative Response Elements (P. Kushner
et al.). GENERAL DISCUSSION I. Nuclear Receptor Versus Plasma Membrane Oestrogen Receptor (E. Levin). Novel Sites and Mechanisms of Oestrogen Action in the Brain (C. Toran-Allerand). Oestrogen Modulation of Noradrenaline Neurotransmission (A. Herbison
et al.). Oestrogen and the Cholinergic Hypothesis: Implications for Oestrogen Replacement Therapy in Postmenopausal Women (R. Gibbs). Ovarian Steroid Action in the Serotonin Neural System of Macaques (C. Bethea
et al.). Oestrogen Effects on Dopaminergic Function in Striatum (J. Becker). GENERAL DISCUSSION II. Oestrogen Effects in Olivo-Cerebellar and Hippocampal Circuits (S. Smith
et al.). Effects of Oestradiol on Hippocampal Circuitry (C. Woolley). Oestrogen and Cognitive Function Throughout the Female Lifespan (B. Sherwin). Neuroprotective Effects of Phenolic A Ring Oestrogens (P. Green
et al.). The Female Sex Hormone Oestrogen as Neuroprotectant: Activities at Various Levels (C. Behl
et al.). Neurohormonal Signalling Pathways and the Regulation of Alzheimer ß-Amyloid Metabolism (S. Gandy & S. Petanceska). Oestrogens and Dementia (V. Henderson). Indexes.
Rezensionen
"The text is an excellent summary of what is new on estrogens in the brain and will be of interest to neuroscience departments..." Jnl of the Neurological Sciences, March 2001