19,99 €
inkl. MwSt.
Versandfertig in 2-4 Wochen
payback
10 °P sammeln
  • Broschiertes Buch

The Waves, first published in 1931, is Virginia Woolf's most experimental novel. The 21st Century author and critic Becky Nordensten has described The Waves as a "beautiful novel with language and imagery unmatched in 20th Century English literature." In 1996, Italian pianist Ludovico Einaudi released a solo piano album "Le Onde" based upon the novel.

Andere Kunden interessierten sich auch für
Produktbeschreibung
The Waves, first published in 1931, is Virginia Woolf's most experimental novel. The 21st Century author and critic Becky Nordensten has described The Waves as a "beautiful novel with language and imagery unmatched in 20th Century English literature." In 1996, Italian pianist Ludovico Einaudi released a solo piano album "Le Onde" based upon the novel.
Autorenporträt
Adeline Virginia Woolf (1882 - 1941) was an English writer who is considered one of the most important modernist twentieth century authors and a pioneer in the use of stream of consciousness as a narrative device. She was born in an affluent household in South Kensington, London, attended the Ladies' Department of King's College and was acquainted with the early reformers of women's higher education. Having been home-schooled for the most part of her childhood, mostly in English classics and Victorian literature, Woolf began writing professionally in 1900. During the interwar period, Woolf was an important part of London's literary society as well as a central figure in the group of intellectuals known as the Bloomsbury Group. She published her first novel titled The Voyage Out in 1915, through her half-brother's publishing house, Gerald Duckworth and Company. Her best-known works include the novels Mrs Dalloway (1925), To the Lighthouse (1927) and Orlando (1928). She is also known for her essay A Room of One's Own (1929), where she wrote the much-quoted dictum, "A woman must have money and a room of her own if she is to write fiction." Woolf became one of the central subjects of the 1970s movement of feminist criticism and her works have since garnered much attention and widespread commentary for "inspiring feminism", an aspect of her writing that was unheralded earlier. Her works are widely read all over the world and have been translated into more than fifty languages. She suffered from severe bouts of mental illness throughout her life and took her own life by drowning in 1941 at the age of 59.