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  • Format: ePub

How do identity and social circumstances affect experiences of the criminal legal system in the US?
It's no secret that factors such as race and socio-economic status will affect a person's experience of life, and contact with the criminal legal system is no different. Drawing on the author's own experience of jail and the criminal legal system, as well as academic literature in the field of carceral studies, this book explores how pre-existing inequities play out and reproduce themselves.
Ideal reading for students of Incarceration Studies, Black Studies, African American Studies,
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Produktbeschreibung
How do identity and social circumstances affect experiences of the criminal legal system in the US?

It's no secret that factors such as race and socio-economic status will affect a person's experience of life, and contact with the criminal legal system is no different. Drawing on the author's own experience of jail and the criminal legal system, as well as academic literature in the field of carceral studies, this book explores how pre-existing inequities play out and reproduce themselves.

Ideal reading for students of Incarceration Studies, Black Studies, African American Studies, Sociology, Cultural History, American Studies, Criminology and Interdisciplinary Studies, this book explores and illustrates the disparities encountered in the criminal legal system of the United States.


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Autorenporträt
Andrew Taylor MPA is a quantitative research manager at the data collaborative for justice, John Jay College of Criminal Justice, City University of New York. Andrew's research focuses on using data science methods to leverage administrative and alternative data for applied research that is seeking to reduce racial disparities and the overall footprint of the criminal legal system.