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"April is the cruellest month." This observation, echoing Chaucer, opens the most important poem of the twentieth century. As often imitated as it has been parodied, T.S. Eliot's The Waste Land introduced a new poetry to the world. Fragmented, polyphonic, multilingual, and mythical in scope, The Waste Land is a haunting vision of postwar Britain and a powerful excavation of self.

Produktbeschreibung
"April is the cruellest month." This observation, echoing Chaucer, opens the most important poem of the twentieth century. As often imitated as it has been parodied, T.S. Eliot's The Waste Land introduced a new poetry to the world. Fragmented, polyphonic, multilingual, and mythical in scope, The Waste Land is a haunting vision of postwar Britain and a powerful excavation of self.
Autorenporträt
T.S. Eliot (1888-1965) was a British poet of American descent. Born in St. Louis, Missouri to a prominent family from Boston, Eliot was raised in a religious and intellectual household. Childhood ailments left Eliot isolated for much of his youth, encouraging his interest in literature. At the age of ten, he entered a preparatory school where he studied Latin, Ancient Greek, French, and German. During this time, he also began writing poetry. From 1906 to 1909, he studied at Harvard University, earning a Master of Arts in English literature and introducing himself to the poetry of the French Symbolists. Over the next several years, he studied Indian philosophy and Sanskrit at the Harvard Graduate School before attending Oxford on a scholarship to Merton College. Tiring of academic life, however, he abandoned his studies and moved to London, where he met the poet Ezra Pound. With Pound's encouragement and editing, Eliot published such poems as "The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock" (1915) and "The Waste Land" (1922), works that earned him a reputation as one of the twentieth century's leading poets and a major figure in literary Modernism. Living in England with his wife Vivienne-from whom he would separate in 1932-Eliot worked as a prominent publisher for Faber and Faber, working with such poets as W.H. Auden and Ted Hughes. He converted to Anglicanism in 1927, an event that inspired his poem "Ash-Wednesday" (1930) and led to the composition of his masterpiece Four Quartets (1943). Eliot was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1948.