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In this essay, Bonfreschi and Maccaferri consider the concept of regionalismfrom a subnationalperspective rather than an internationalone, discussing the problem of how states deal with regions or smaller unities within the state.

Produktbeschreibung
In this essay, Bonfreschi and Maccaferri consider the concept of regionalismfrom a subnationalperspective rather than an internationalone, discussing the problem of how states deal with regions or smaller unities within the state.
Autorenporträt
Lucia Bonfreschi is assistant professor of political history at IMT Institute for Advanced Studies Lucca (Italy). She is also adjunct professor of History of Political Institutions at Luiss-Guido Carli University in Rome. She has written a book on Raymond Aron e il gollismo 1940-1969 (Rubbettino, 2014) and many articles and papers on French political and intellectual history (19th and 20th Century) and on Italian political history (20th century). Marzia Maccaferri worked at the University of Bologna, the University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, and held visiting research positions at the Department of Italian, University of Cambridge and at the Institute of Historical Research, London. She received her PhD in History from the University of Bologna and currently she teaches European Comparative Politics at Goldsmiths, University of London. Her publications include Between Empire and Europe. Intellectuals and the Nation in Britain and France During the Cold War, co-written with Lucia Bonfreschi (Routledge, forthcoming) and 'I partiti politici a Bologna durante la Prima repubblica' (BUP, 2013). Her interests range across interdisciplinary and comparative European history, in particular the theory and history of the intellectual and political narratives during the post-WW2 period in Europe. She is also interested in the construction of cultural and political identity, history of ideas and history of political cultures, the history of Europe as a political project