40,99 €
inkl. MwSt.
Versandkostenfrei*
Versandfertig in über 4 Wochen
  • Gebundenes Buch

What's the best way to approach a potential customer? What tactics do effective salesman use to demonstrate the product for sale? What methods are best for closing the deal? In this classic of pop psychology, first published in 1912, William Walker Atkinson-one of the most influential thinkers of the early-20th-century "New Age" philosophy of New Thought-discusses the mental components of great salesmanship, including: ¿ psychology in business ¿ the mind of the salesman ¿ the mind of the buyer ¿ the psychology of purchase ¿ and much more American writer WILLIAM WALKER ATKINSON (1862-1932) was…mehr

Produktbeschreibung
What's the best way to approach a potential customer? What tactics do effective salesman use to demonstrate the product for sale? What methods are best for closing the deal? In this classic of pop psychology, first published in 1912, William Walker Atkinson-one of the most influential thinkers of the early-20th-century "New Age" philosophy of New Thought-discusses the mental components of great salesmanship, including: ¿ psychology in business ¿ the mind of the salesman ¿ the mind of the buyer ¿ the psychology of purchase ¿ and much more American writer WILLIAM WALKER ATKINSON (1862-1932) was editor of the popular magazine New Thought from 1901 to 1905, and editor of the journal Advanced Thought from 1916 to 1919. He authored dozens of New Thought books under numerous pseudonyms, including "Yogi," some of which are likely still unknown today.
Autorenporträt
William Walker Atkinson (December 5, 1862 - November 22, 1932) was an attorney, merchant, publisher, and author, as well as an occultist and an American pioneer of the New Thought movement. He is the author of the pseudonymous works attributed to Theron Q. Dumont and Yogi Ramacharaka.[1] He wrote an estimated 100 books, all in the last 30 years of his life. He was mentioned in past editions of Who's Who in America, in Religious Leaders of America, and in several similar publications. His works have remained in print more or less continuously since 1900. William Walker Atkinson was born in Baltimore, Maryland on December 5, 1862,[4] to Emma and William Atkinson. He began his working life as a grocer at 15 years old, probably helping his father. He married Margret Foster Black of Beverly, New Jersey, in October 1889, and they had two children. Their first child probably died young. The second later married and had two daughters. Atkinson pursued a business career from 1882 onwards and in 1894 he was admitted as an attorney to the Bar of Pennsylvania. While he gained much material success in his profession as a lawyer, the stress and over-strain eventually took its toll, and during this time he experienced a complete physical and mental breakdown, and financial disaster. He looked for healing and in the late 1880s he found it with New Thought, later attributing the restoration of his health, mental vigor and material prosperity to the application of the principles of New Thought. Some time after his healing, Atkinson began to write articles on the truths he felt he had discovered, which were then known as Mental Science. In 1889, an article by him entitled "A Mental Science Catechism," appeared in Charles Fillmore's new periodical, Modern Thought. By the early 1890s Chicago had become a major centre for New Thought, mainly through the work of Emma Curtis Hopkins, and Atkinson decided to move there. Once in the city, he became an active promoter of the movement as an editor and author. He was responsible for publishing the magazines Suggestion (1900-1901), New Thought (1901-1905) and Advanced Thought (1906-1916). In 1900 Atkinson worked as an associate editor of Suggestion, a New Thought Journal, and wrote his probable first book, Thought-Force in Business and Everyday Life, being a series of lessons in personal magnetism, psychic influence, thought-force, concentration, will-power, and practical mental science.