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This scarce antiquarian book is a facsimile reprint of the original. Due to its age, it may contain imperfections such as marks, notations, marginalia and flawed pages. Because we believe this work is culturally important, we have made it available as part of our commitment for protecting, preserving, and promoting the world's literature in affordable, high quality, modern editions that are true to the original work.

Produktbeschreibung
This scarce antiquarian book is a facsimile reprint of the original. Due to its age, it may contain imperfections such as marks, notations, marginalia and flawed pages. Because we believe this work is culturally important, we have made it available as part of our commitment for protecting, preserving, and promoting the world's literature in affordable, high quality, modern editions that are true to the original work.
Autorenporträt
John Galt was a Scottish author, entrepreneur, and political and social commentator. Galt has been dubbed the first political author in the English language since he was the first to address concerns related to the Industrial Revolution. Galt was the Canada Company's first superintendent (1826-1829). In the first half of the nineteenth century, the company was created to populate a part of what is now Southern Ontario (then known as Upper Canada); it was later considered "the most important single attempt at settlement in Canadian history". Galt was recalled to Britain in 1829 for mismanagement of the Canada Company (especially inept bookkeeping), and he was later imprisoned for failing to pay his son's tuition. Galt was born in Irvine, Ayrshire, the son of a naval captain who traded in the West Indies. He was a first cousin to Captain Alexander Allan. His father relocated to Greenock around 1780. The family paid him regular visits but did not return permanently until 1789. John attended Irvine Grammar School alongside Henry Eckford, a lifelong friend, and William Spence. Galt spent a few months at the Greenock Custom House when he was 17 years old. He then worked as an apprentice and junior clerk for his uncle, Mr. Ewing, while simultaneously penning essays and stories for local journals in his own time. He relocated to London in 1804 to join his father and seek his wealth.