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Melanie E. L. Bush is Associate Professor in the Department of Anthropology and Sociology at Adelphi University and author of Everyday Forms of Whiteness: Understanding Race in a "Post-Racial" World, the second edition of Breaking the Code of Good Intentions: Everyday Forms of Whiteness. ¿ Roderick D. Bush (1945-2013) was Professor in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology at St. John's University, and the author of The End of White World Supremacy: Black Internationalism and the Problem of the Color Line (Temple), which won the Paul Sweezy Marxist Sociology Book Award from the American…mehr

Produktbeschreibung
Melanie E. L. Bush is Associate Professor in the Department of Anthropology and Sociology at Adelphi University and author of Everyday Forms of Whiteness: Understanding Race in a "Post-Racial" World, the second edition of Breaking the Code of Good Intentions: Everyday Forms of Whiteness. ¿ Roderick D. Bush (1945-2013) was Professor in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology at St. John's University, and the author of The End of White World Supremacy: Black Internationalism and the Problem of the Color Line (Temple), which won the Paul Sweezy Marxist Sociology Book Award from the American Sociological Association, and We Are Not What We Seem: Black Nationalism and Class Struggle in the American Century.
Autorenporträt
Melanie E. L. Bush is Associate Professor in the Department of Anthropology and Sociology at Adelphi University and author of Everyday Forms of Whiteness: Understanding Race in a "Post-Racial" World, the second edition of Breaking the Code of Good Intentions: Everyday Forms of Whiteness.   Roderick D. Bush (1945-2013) was Professor in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology at St. John's University, and the author of The End of White World Supremacy: Black Internationalism and the Problem of the Color Line (Temple), which won the Paul Sweezy Marxist Sociology Book Award from the American Sociological Association, and We Are Not What We Seem: Black Nationalism and Class Struggle in the American Century.