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No area of Portland, Oregon, played a more important role in street railway history than Northwest Portland and the neighborhood known as Slabtown. In 1872, the city's first streetcars passed close to Slabtown as they headed for a terminus in the North End. Slabtown was also home to the first streetcar manufacturing factory on the West Coast. In fact, until locally built streetcars began to be replaced by trolleys from large national builders in the 1910s, more than half of all rolling stock was manufactured in shops located at opposite ends of Northwest Twenty-third Avenue. All streetcars…mehr

Produktbeschreibung
No area of Portland, Oregon, played a more important role in street railway history than Northwest Portland and the neighborhood known as Slabtown. In 1872, the city's first streetcars passed close to Slabtown as they headed for a terminus in the North End. Slabtown was also home to the first streetcar manufacturing factory on the West Coast. In fact, until locally built streetcars began to be replaced by trolleys from large national builders in the 1910s, more than half of all rolling stock was manufactured in shops located at opposite ends of Northwest Twenty-third Avenue. All streetcars operating on the west side of the Willamette River, including those used on the seven lines that served Northwest Portland, were stored in Slabtown. When the end finally came in 1950, Slabtown residents were riding two of the last three city lines.
Autorenporträt
Richard Thompson was cartoonist who created both Richard's Poor Almanac and Cul de Sac for the Washington Post. He drew caricatures for US News & World Report and The New Yorker. He won the 2011 Reuben Award for Outstanding Cartoonist of the Year. Bill Watterson wrote the introduction to his 2nd book and considered him a good friend. Mike Rhode is coauthor of the Comics Research Bibliography, editor of Exhibition and Media Reviews and general assistant editor of the International Journal of Comic Art, and has written for Hogan's Alley and the Comics Journal. He's been a judge for the RFK Journalism Awards editorial cartoon division from 2009-2022 and in 2015, 2016 & 2020, was a Herblock Award judge. He edited Harvey Pekar: Conversations, a book of interviews for the University Press of Mississippi and edited and published Biographical Sketches of Cartoonists & Illustrators in the Swann Collection of the Library of Congress by LOC's curator Sara Duke. In 2014, he co-edited The Art of Richard Thompson and The Incomplete Art of "Why Things Are" by Richard Thompson in 2017. In 2008 his ComicsDC blog was chosen Best (Comics) Art Blogger by the Washington City Paper and from 2010-16, he wrote on comics for the Washington City Paper. Chris Sparks is the force behind Team Cul de Sac, a fundraiser for the Michael J. Fox Foundation to end Parkinson's disease. He edited the books Team Cul de Sac and The Art of Richard Thompson, and continues his fundraising projects. He is co-owner of a web design company.