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Since the 1800s, the majority of Biblical scholars have interpreted the books of Leviticus and Numbers as a later addition to the original laws of Moses found in Exodus, with Deuteronomy being an even later addition during the Babylonian or Persian eras. Cosmic Genesis is either considered to be part of Moses' original work or a later addition in the Persian era, depending on the scholar. Leviticus and Numbers contain several amendments to Moses' laws in Exodus, as well as establishing the land rights of the various tribes of Israel within historic Canaan, including the assignment of several…mehr

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Since the 1800s, the majority of Biblical scholars have interpreted the books of Leviticus and Numbers as a later addition to the original laws of Moses found in Exodus, with Deuteronomy being an even later addition during the Babylonian or Persian eras. Cosmic Genesis is either considered to be part of Moses' original work or a later addition in the Persian era, depending on the scholar. Leviticus and Numbers contain several amendments to Moses' laws in Exodus, as well as establishing the land rights of the various tribes of Israel within historic Canaan, including the assignment of several cities and their environs to the Levitical Priesthood. The most obvious amendment to Moses' laws, is replacing the sacrifice of the firstborn with the establishment of the Levitical Priesthood. Exodus 13 includes a requirement that the firstborn Israelites must be slaughtered as a sacrifice to the Lord, however, allowed an animal to be substituted. This law would not have been difficult for a group of nomadic shepherds to follow but would have become progressively more difficult as the Israelites became more urbanized in Canaan. The substitution of the Levitical Priesthood for the firstborn Israelites was established in Numbers chapter 3. This 'authorized' Torah also removed the Korahites from the Temple of Solomon, adding the Revolt of Korah to the Torah, set long before the Israelites entered Canaan. The Sons of Korah, or Korahites, were a rival priesthood to the Levites that administered the Temple of Solomon from the time of Solomon until Josiah. They are believed to have originally been the priesthood of El Elyon at the Jebusite Temple before David conquered them. Solomon, David's youngest son, was an unlikely heir, and not the original heir apparent, as his elder brother Adonijah attempted to succeed David by marrying Abishag the Shunamite, David's youngest wife, who was twelve years old at the time. However, Solomon's Jebusite mother Bathsheba, and the prophet Nathan conspired to place the fifteen-year-old Solomon on the throne and then purged the government of non-Jebusites, who appear to have all supported Adonijah. The Sons of Korah were the authors of some of the Psalms, and are documented as existing in Judea as late as the Persian era, although seem to have disappeared by the early Greek era. Some have theorized they may have formed the priesthood of the Essenes (Nazarenes) in the late-Persian era, as the Essenes had another Torah, and used different holy books from the other Jews, such as the books of Enoch and Jubilees.