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Embalming fluids contain formalin and phenol, which are proven to have diverse toxic effects for embalmers, researchers, students and instructors. Beyond their health and environmental hazard, embalming chemicals are not adequately effective in inhibiting the growth of fungi, bacteria and maggots. Hence, this study was conducted to isolate fungi grown on formalin-fixed cadavers and test their susceptibilities to crude extracts as well as solvent fractions of Vernonia amygdalina Del. and Croton macrostachyus hochst. ex Del. This study confirmed that several fungal species grow on the surface of…mehr

Produktbeschreibung
Embalming fluids contain formalin and phenol, which are proven to have diverse toxic effects for embalmers, researchers, students and instructors. Beyond their health and environmental hazard, embalming chemicals are not adequately effective in inhibiting the growth of fungi, bacteria and maggots. Hence, this study was conducted to isolate fungi grown on formalin-fixed cadavers and test their susceptibilities to crude extracts as well as solvent fractions of Vernonia amygdalina Del. and Croton macrostachyus hochst. ex Del. This study confirmed that several fungal species grow on the surface of formalin-fixed human cadavers. Moreover, the findings of the present study have established the susceptibilities of some of the isolated fungal species to the extracts of V. amygdalina and C. macrostachyus. Among the various extracts tested, the aqueous extract of C. macrostachyus and 80% methanol extract of V. amygdalina exhibited promising activity against some of the tested fungi. The study further provides scientific evidence for the use of the leaves of V. amygdalina for preservation of corpse by people in southern Ethiopia.
Autorenporträt
Yossef Teshome has BSc. degree in Biology and MSc. degree in Medical Anatomy. He has worked for one and half year at Debre Berhan University as biology technician. Currently he has been working at Addis Ababa University as lecturer of Anatomy. Tadesse Kebede, Abera Abdeta, Birhanu Gizaw and Negero Gemeda also contributed as co-authors of this book.