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Millennials are often publicly criticized for being apathetic about the American political process and their lack of interest in political careers. But what do millennials themselves have to say about the prospect of holding political office? Are they as uninterested in political issues and the future of the American political system as the media suggests? This book goes directly to the source, including over 50 interviews, with graduate students in elite institutions that have historically been a direct link for their graduates into state or federal elected office: Harvard Law, Harvard's…mehr

Produktbeschreibung
Millennials are often publicly criticized for being apathetic about the American political process and their lack of interest in political careers. But what do millennials themselves have to say about the prospect of holding political office? Are they as uninterested in political issues and the future of the American political system as the media suggests? This book goes directly to the source, including over 50 interviews, with graduate students in elite institutions that have historically been a direct link for their graduates into state or federal elected office: Harvard Law, Harvard's Kennedy School of Government, and Boston's Suffolk University Law School. Shames, herself a young graduate of Harvard University, suggests that millennials are not uninterested; rather, they don't believe that a career in politics is the best way to create change. Millennials view the system as corrupt or inefficient and are particularly skeptical about the fundraising, frenzied media attention, and loss of privacy that have become staples of the American electoral process. They are clear about their desire to make a difference in the world but feel that the 'broken' political system is not the best way to do so -- a belief held particularly by millennial women and women of color. The implications of her argument are crucial for the future of the American political system -- how can a system adapt and grow if qualified, intelligent leaders are not involved?
Autorenporträt
Shauna L. Shames is Assistant Professor of Political Science at Rutgers University-Camden. Prior to entering academia, she worked with several nonprofit and feminist organizations, including the National Organization for Women (NOW) and The White House Project. She received her PhD from Harvard University in 2014.