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Merton Gill is no ordinary man -- being hardly Merton Gill at all, but rather the romantic and popular idol of the silver screen -- Clifford Armytage! -- starring in his great role as the prairie-ranging, villain-busting hero Buck Benson. Or, rather, whoever he is -- Merton, Clifford, or Buck -- he is an ordinary man, walking down through the heart of tiny Simsbury, past the drugstore and hostel, and then waiting in line at the post office for his mail, consisting of three magazines: Photo Land, Silver Screenings, and Camera. He dreams, and unlike his fellow townsfolk he sees no reason to…mehr

Produktbeschreibung
Merton Gill is no ordinary man -- being hardly Merton Gill at all, but rather the romantic and popular idol of the silver screen -- Clifford Armytage! -- starring in his great role as the prairie-ranging, villain-busting hero Buck Benson. Or, rather, whoever he is -- Merton, Clifford, or Buck -- he is an ordinary man, walking down through the heart of tiny Simsbury, past the drugstore and hostel, and then waiting in line at the post office for his mail, consisting of three magazines: Photo Land, Silver Screenings, and Camera. He dreams, and unlike his fellow townsfolk he sees no reason to dream small . . . although there is one other like him, here: Tessie Kearns, the lone soul in Simsbury who understands him. However far away Hollywood might be, she, too, dreams of finding her way there, as a scenario writer.
Autorenporträt
Harry Leon Wilson (1867 - 1939) was an American novelist and dramatist best known for his novels Ruggles of Red Gap and Merton of the Movies. His novel Bunker Bean helped popularize the term flapper. In December 1886, Wilson's story The Elusive Dollar Bill was accepted by Puck magazine. He continued to contribute to Puck and became assistant editor in 1892. Henry Cuyler Bunner died in 1896 and Wilson replaced him as editor. The publication of The Spenders allowed Wilson to quit Puck in 1902 and devote himself full-time to writing. Wilson returned to New York where he met Booth Tarkington in 1904 and Tarkington and Wilson traveled together to Europe in 1905. The two completed the play The Man from Home in 1906 in Paris. The play was a resounding success and was followed by more collaborations with Tarkington, but none repeated the success of the first. Wilson was elected to the National Institute of Arts and Letters in 1908. Wilson returned from Europe and settled permanently into the Bohemian colony at Carmel-by-the-Sea, California, which included among its artists and literati Jack London, Mary Hunter Austin, George Sterling, Upton Sinclair, Xavier Martinez, Ambrose Bierce, Alice MacGowan, Sinclair Lewis, Francis McComas and Arnold Genthe. It was during this period that Wilson wrote the books for which he is most well known, Bunker Bean (1913) and Ruggles of Red Gap (1915). After a brief stint in Hollywood, he composed Merton of the Movies in 1922.