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Language, Nation, and Identity in the Classroom critiques the normalizing aspects of schooling and the taken-for-granted assumptions in education about culture, identity, language, and learning. The text applies theories of postmodernism, postcolonialism, and other critical cultural theories from disciplines often overlooked in the field of education. The authors illustrate the potential of these theories for educators, offering a nuanced critical analysis of the role schools play in nationalistic enterprises and colonial projects. The book fills the current gap between simplified,…mehr

Produktbeschreibung
Language, Nation, and Identity in the Classroom critiques the normalizing aspects of schooling and the taken-for-granted assumptions in education about culture, identity, language, and learning. The text applies theories of postmodernism, postcolonialism, and other critical cultural theories from disciplines often overlooked in the field of education. The authors illustrate the potential of these theories for educators, offering a nuanced critical analysis of the role schools play in nationalistic enterprises and colonial projects. The book fills the current gap between simplified, ahistorical applications of multiculturalism and critical theory texts with only narrow applicability in the field. This clearly written alternative offers both an entry point to rigorous primary theoretical sources and broad applications of the scholarship to everyday practice in a range of PreK-12 classrooms and adult education settings globally. The text is designed for educators and advanced undergraduate or graduate students in the growing number of courses that address issues of cultural diversity, equity in education, multiculturalism, social and cultural foundations of education, literary studies, and educational policy.
Autorenporträt
David Hemphill is a professor, researcher, and musician. He is Professor and Chair in the Graduate College of Education at San Francisco State University, where he has been on the faculty for three decades. He writes widely on culture, language, literacy, and power in education. Erin Blakely has worked in elementary and middle schools for fifteen years as a reading and math specialist, academic dean, and school leadership facilitator. She develops curricula and policy, designs equity initiatives, facilitates collaborative leadership teams, and provides professional development for local school districts.
Rezensionen
«If you think you understand language learning, David Hemphill and Erin Blakely will challenge you to think again. This book insightfully shows how today's schooling, far from exemplifying progress, is rooted in historic processes and practices that organize people into unjust hierarchies. Using marvelous examples to illustrate their keen analysis of the state of U.S. education today, the authors skillfully dislodge assumptions about language and literacy learning that commonly pass as truth.» (Christine Sleeter, Professor Emerita, College of Professional Studies, California State University Monterey Bay)
«David Hemphill and Erin Blakely challenge us to re-engage social theory if we are to understand the persistent reproduction of inequality in our school system. They illuminate the perils of our ahistorical and decontextualized approach to teaching and teacher development, while reminding us of the legacy of colonialism in twenty-first century discussions about the role of schools in our society.» (Jeff Duncan-Andrade, Associate Professor, Raza Studies & Education, San Francisco State University)