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From Constantine's death and the fall of the Western Roman Empire, Volume V of Edward Gibbon's "The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire" covers this time span. According to Gibbon, the Decline of the Roman Empire was a slow-moving process that was brought on by both internal disintegration and outside influences. The empire was split into two during this time, with the Eastern Roman Empire continuing to be powerful while the Western Roman Empire was increasingly threatened by barbarian invasions and internal strife. Gibbon also emphasizes the influence of religion on historical…mehr

Produktbeschreibung
From Constantine's death and the fall of the Western Roman Empire, Volume V of Edward Gibbon's "The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire" covers this time span. According to Gibbon, the Decline of the Roman Empire was a slow-moving process that was brought on by both internal disintegration and outside influences. The empire was split into two during this time, with the Eastern Roman Empire continuing to be powerful while the Western Roman Empire was increasingly threatened by barbarian invasions and internal strife. Gibbon also emphasizes the influence of religion on historical events, particularly the development of Christianity and the struggles between its various factions. Gibbon gives a thorough description of the reigns of significant emperors like Honorius, Theodosius I, and Julian the Apostate as well as the development of strong barbarian leaders like Attila the Hun. Also, he talks about the contributions made by notable individuals like Saint Augustine, who had a huge impact on the growth of Christian theology. Overall, Gibbon's work highlights the subtleties and complexity of the fall of the Roman Empire, demonstrating the different reasons that led to its eventual downfall.
Autorenporträt
Edward Gibbon was a member of the English parliament, a historian, and a writer. On May 8, 1737, he was born, and on January 16, 1794, he died. His most important work, The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, came out in six parts between 1776 and 1788. It is known for the quality and irony of its prose, the way it uses first-hand sources, and the way it criticizes organized religion in a polemical way. After getting sick in 1752, Gibbon went to Bath to get better. When he was 15, his father sent him to Oxford to study as a gentleman commoner at Magdalen College. But he didn't fit in well at college, and he later said that the 14 months he spent there were the "most useless and unprofitable" of his life. He lived in Lausanne for five years and read works by Hugo Grotius, Samuel von Pufendorf, John Locke, Pierre Bayle, and Blaise Pascal. He also traveled around Switzerland to study the constitutions of its cantons.