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    Broschiertes Buch

In the 1930s, Germany was at a turning point, with many looking to the Nazi phenomenon as part of widespread resentment towards cosmopolitan liberal democracy and capitalism. This was a global situation that pushed Germany to embrace authoritarianism, nationalism and economic self-sufficiency, kick-starting a revolution founded on new media technologies, and the formidable political and self-promotional skills of its leader. Based on award-winning research and recently discovered archival material, The Death of Democracy is a panoramic new survey of one of the most important periods in modern…mehr

Produktbeschreibung
In the 1930s, Germany was at a turning point, with many looking to the Nazi phenomenon as part of widespread resentment towards cosmopolitan liberal democracy and capitalism. This was a global situation that pushed Germany to embrace authoritarianism, nationalism and economic self-sufficiency, kick-starting a revolution founded on new media technologies, and the formidable political and self-promotional skills of its leader. Based on award-winning research and recently discovered archival material, The Death of Democracy is a panoramic new survey of one of the most important periods in modern history, and a book with a resounding message for the world today.
  • Produktdetails
  • Verlag: Random House UK Ltd
  • Erscheinungstermin: 21. Februar 2019
  • Englisch
  • Abmessung: 198mm x 128mm x 25mm
  • Gewicht: 214g
  • ISBN-13: 9781786090300
  • ISBN-10: 1786090309
  • Artikelnr.: 53916009
Autorenporträt
Benjamin Carter Hett is a former trial lawyer and a professor of history at Hunter College and the Graduate Center, City University of New York. He is the author of Death in the Tiergarten, Crossing Hitler, winner of the Fraenkel Prize, and Burning the Reichstag.
Rezensionen
"Benjamin Carter Hett deftly summarises this dismal period... Hett refrains from poking the reader with too many obvious contemporary parallels, but he knew what he was doing when he left "German" out of his title. On the book's final page, he lays his cards on the table... "Suddenly, the whole thing looks close and familiar." Yes, it does."