The Corinthian Dissenters and the Stoics - Garcilazo, Albert V.
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This book focuses on the controversy recorded in 1 Corinthians 15 regarding the denial of the resurrection of the dead. Many attempts and proposals have been made to understand the background of Paul's opponents. By focusing on the possible impact of Stoicism, Albert V. Garcilazo argues that the internal evidence of the letter indicates that some of the Corinthians had adopted a realized eschatology as well as an antisomatic view of the resurrection, which in turn prompted them to reject the future resurrection of the dead. Garcilazo suggests that the higher status members of the congregation…mehr

Produktbeschreibung
This book focuses on the controversy recorded in 1 Corinthians 15 regarding the denial of the resurrection of the dead. Many attempts and proposals have been made to understand the background of Paul's opponents. By focusing on the possible impact of Stoicism, Albert V. Garcilazo argues that the internal evidence of the letter indicates that some of the Corinthians had adopted a realized eschatology as well as an antisomatic view of the resurrection, which in turn prompted them to reject the future resurrection of the dead. Garcilazo suggests that the higher status members of the congregation were influenced by the cosmological, anthropological, and ethical teachings of the Stoa, especially the tenets of the Roman Stoics. He demonstrates this possibility by first considering the similarities between the doctrines of the Corinthian dissenters and the teachings of the Stoic philosophers, particularly the teachings of Seneca. Following a brief overview of Stoicism, the author concentrates on some of the theological issues revealed in the letter and examines how other scholars have interpreted 1 Corinthians 15. Finally, he provides a detailed analysis of 1 Corinthians 15:12-49. In short, Garcilazo argues that the philosophy of the Stoics seemingly contributed to the resurrection controversy recorded in 1 Corinthians 15.
  • Produktdetails
  • Studies in Biblical Literature .106
  • Verlag: Peter Lang Ltd. International Academic Publishers
  • Artikelnr. des Verlages: .69521, 69521
  • Neuausg.
  • Erscheinungstermin: 16. Mai 2007
  • Englisch
  • Abmessung: 231mm x 154mm x 22mm
  • Gewicht: 580g
  • ISBN-13: 9780820495217
  • ISBN-10: 0820495212
  • Artikelnr.: 23026842
Autorenporträt
The Author: Albert V. Garcilazo, a veteran of the U.S. Air Force, earned a B.A. in theology and biblical languages from Walla Walla College, an M.Div. from Andrews University, and a Ph.D. in theology (New Testament studies) from Fuller Theological Seminary. He has served as a pastor for nearly eighteen years in the Seventh-day Adventist Church and as an adjunct instructor for Azusa Pacific University, La Sierra University, and Fuller Theological Seminary. Garcilazo is currently the senior chaplain of Glendale Adventist Medical Center, Glendale, California.
Rezensionen
"This book is a careful and important analysis of Paul's teaching of the resurrection chapter in 1 Corinthians, and it will be invaluable to all students of this letter and of Paul's theology. Albert V. Garcilazo offers a fresh and innovative attempt to set Paul's eschatology in the light of religious philosophy current in ancient Corinth. This book finds a place in the growing library of New Testament backgrounds. I warmly recommend it." (Ralph P. Martin, Distinguished Scholar in Residence (New Testament), Fuller Theological Seminary, Azusa Pacific University)
"Albert Garcilazo has produced a masterful study of a portion of 1 Corinthians. He makes a compelling argument for his central thesis: that Roman Stoicism is the key philosophical context for understanding this part of Paul's first letter to the Corinthians. He anticipates and responds well to the key alternate views and likely objections to his view. He demonstrates knowledge both deep and broad of, and respect for, the pertinent work of other scholars. While taking into account the work of others, he aptly charts his own course and presents original conclusions in a highly readable and enjoyable style." (James S. Jeffers, Coordinator, Humanities Master of Arts Degree, California State University)