The 'Civilising Mission' of Portuguese Colonialism, 1870-1930 - Jerónimo, Miguel Bandeira
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This book provides an historical, critical analysis of the doctrine of 'civilising mission' in Portuguese colonialism in the crucial period from 1870 to 1930. Exploring international contexts and transnational connections, this 'civilising mission' is analysed and assessed by examining the employment and distribution of African manpower.…mehr

Produktbeschreibung
This book provides an historical, critical analysis of the doctrine of 'civilising mission' in Portuguese colonialism in the crucial period from 1870 to 1930. Exploring international contexts and transnational connections, this 'civilising mission' is analysed and assessed by examining the employment and distribution of African manpower.
Autorenporträt
Miguel Bandeira Jerónimo is Researcher at the Institute of Social Sciences, University of Lisbon, Portugal. His interests focus on the Comparative Histories of Imperialism and Colonialism. He recently published A diplomacia do império and edited O império colonial em questão (both in 2012), and co-edited Portugal e o fim do colonialismo (2014) and The Ends of European Colonial Empires: Cases and Comparisons (2015).
Inhaltsangabe
PART I: THE 'CIVILISATION GUILD': NATIVE LABOUR AND PORTUGUESE COLONIALISM 1. Between Benevolence and Inevitability: The 'Civilising Mission' of Portuguese Colonialism 2. The Civilisation Guild and the 'Engineers of Depression': The Case of the S. Thomé Cocoa 3. 'Redemptive Labour' and the Missionaries of the Alphabet PART II: COLONIALISM WITHOUT BORDERS 4. Bibles, Flags and Transnational Loyalties: Educating Empires 5. New Methods, Old Conclusions: The Ross Report Conclusion

Rezensionen
"Miguel Bandeira Jerónimo's sophisticated and detailed study of the Portuguese 'civilising mission' in Africa is an especially welcome contribution to the field. ... This is a significant new addition to the literature on Portuguese Africa and it will be especially welcomed not only by Africanists but also labor historians as well as those focused on New Imperialism." (Timothy Coates, American Historical Review, Vol. 121 (4), October, 2016)