16-Bit-Microprocessor Systems - Flik, Thomas; Liebig, Hans
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In the last few years, a large number of books on microprocessors have appeared on the market. Most of them originated in the context of the 4-bit and the 8-bit microprocessors and their comparatively simple structure. However, the techno-logical development from 8-bit to 16-bit microprossors led to processor components with a substantially more complex structure and with an expanded functionality and also to an increase in the system architecture's complexity. This books takes this advancement into account. It examines 16-bit micro-processor systems and descrihes their structure, their…mehr

Produktbeschreibung
In the last few years, a large number of books on microprocessors have appeared on the market. Most of them originated in the context of the 4-bit and the 8-bit microprocessors and their comparatively simple structure. However, the techno-logical development from 8-bit to 16-bit microprossors led to processor components with a substantially more complex structure and with an expanded functionality and also to an increase in the system architecture's complexity. This books takes this advancement into account. It examines 16-bit micro-processor systems and descrihes their structure, their behavior and their programming. The principles of computer or ganization are treated at the component level. This is done by means of a detailed examination of the characteristic functionali ty of microprocessors. Furthermore the interactions between hardware and software, that are typical of microprocessor technology, are introduced. Interfacing techniques are one of the focal points of these considerations. This puplication is organized as a textbook and is intended as a self-teaching course on 16-bit microprocessors for students of computer science and communications, design engineers and users in a wide variety of technical and scientific fields. Basic knowledge of boolean algebra is assumed. The choice of material is based on the 16-bit microprocessors that are currently available on the market; on the other hand, the presentation is not bound to anyone of these microprocessors.
  • Produktdetails
  • Verlag: Springer, Berlin
  • 1985.
  • Seitenzahl: 252
  • Erscheinungstermin: 1. August 1985
  • Englisch
  • Abmessung: 244mm x 170mm x 13mm
  • Gewicht: 430g
  • ISBN-13: 9783540151647
  • ISBN-10: 3540151648
  • Artikelnr.: 36111859
Autorenporträt
Hans Liebig ,1939 in Ebersbach geboren,studierte Elektrotechnik an der Technischen Hochschule München und arbeitete dannach als Entwicklungsingenieur im Fachgebiet Informationstechnik Elektronische Rechenanlagen. Später war er als wissenschaftlicher Assistent am Institut für Informationsverarbeitung der Technischen Universität Berlin, dann als Professor für Informatik an der Technischen Universität Berlin tätig. Seit 1968 hält er Vorlesungen über Logische Entwürfe digitaler Systeme, über Rechnerorganisation sowie über Prinzipien der Rechnerstrukturen.

Thomas Flik, geboren 1943 in Freudenstadt, studierte von 1962 bis 1969 Nachrichtentechnik an der TU Berlin. Dort war er wissenschaftlicher Assistent in der Informatik-Forschungsgruppe Digitale Signalverarbeitung bei Professor Dr.-Ing. W. Giloi. Promotion 1973 im Bereich Mustererkennung. Seit 1974 ist Thomas Flik wissenschaftlicher Mitarbeiter am Institut für Technische Informatik der TU Berlin bei Professor Dr.-Ing. H. Liebig. Arbeitsgebiete: Rechnerorganisation, Mikroprozessortechnik.
Inhaltsangabe
1 Introduction to the Structure and the Programming of a Microprocessor.- 1.1 Representation of Information.- 1.1.1 Information Units.- 1.1.2 Number Representation.- 1.1.3 Symbol Representation.- 1.1.4 Hexadecimal and Octal Representation.- 1.2 Introduction to the Hardware Structure.- 1.2.1 Hardware Components of a Microprocessor System.- 1.2.2 Basic System Structure.- 1.2.3 The Microprocessor.- 1.2.4 The Memory.- 1.2.5 I/O Unit.- 1.3 Introduction to Assembly Language Programming.- 1.3.1 Program Representation.- 1.3.2 Program Translation (Assembling).- 1.3.3 Program Input and Text Output.- 2 The 16-Bit Microprocessor.- 2.1 Microprocessor Structure.- 2.1.1 Programming Model.- 2.1.2 Data Types, Data Formats and Data Access.- 2.1.3 Extended Address Space.- 2.1.4 Instruction Formats and Addressing Modes.- 2.2 Instruction Set.- 2.2.1 Data Transfer Instructions.- 2.2.2 Arithmetic Instructions.- 2.2.3 Logic Instructions.- 2.2.4 Bit Processing Instructions.- 2.2.5 Shift and Rotate Instructions.- 2.2.6 Jump Instructions.- 2.2.7 String Instructions.- 2.2.8 System Instructions.- 2.3 Exception Processing.- 2.3.1 Trap and Interrupt Management.- 2.3.2 System and User Mode.- 3 Programming Techniques.- 3.1 Assembler Programming.- 3.1.1 Flowcharts.- 3.1.2 Assembly Language.- 3.1.3 Pseudo-ops.- 3.1.4 Absolute and Relocatable Program Blocks.- 3.1.5 Structured Assembler Programming.- 3.1.6 Macroinstructions and Conditional Assembling.- 3.2 Program Flow Control.- 3.2.1 Unconditional Jump.- 3.2.2 Conditional Jump and Simple Branch.- 3.2.3 Multiple-Way Branch.- 3.2.4 Program Loops.- 3.3 Subprogram Techniques.- 3.3.1 Subprogram Call and Return.- 3.3.2 Parameter Passing.- 3.3.3 Global Program and Data Accesses.- 3.3.4 Nested Subprograms.- 4 System Structure.- 4.1 System Structure.- 4.1.1 Single-Chip and Single-Card Systems.- 4.1.2 Bus Oriented Multiple-Card Systems.- 4.1.3 System Bus.- 4.1.4 Microprocessor Signals.- 4.2 Addressing of System Components.- 4.2.1 Isolated and Memory-Mapped Addressing.- 4.2.2 Card Selection and Component Selection.- 4.2.3 Word/Byte Selection.- 4.2.4 Memory Management.- 4.2.5 Memory Management Units.- 4.3 Data Transfer.- 4.3.1 Bus Coupling.- 4.3.2 Data Transfer Control.- 4.4 Interrupt Systems.- 4.4.1 Interrupt Priority and Interrupt Cycle.- 4.4.2 Allocation of Interrupt Levels.- 4.4.3 System Control Signals.- 4.5 Bus Allocation.- 4.5.1 Local Bus Allocation.- 4.5.2 Global Bus Allocation.- 5 Input/Output Organization.- 5.1 Input/Output Control with the Microprocessor.- 5.1.1 Synchronization with Busy Waiting.- 5.1.2 Synchronization with Program Interruption.- 5.1.3 Synchronization with Handshaking.- 5.1.4 Simultaneous Handling of Several Input/Output Activities.- 5.2 Data Transmission Systems and Remote Data Transmission.- 5.2.1 Data Transfer Techniques.- 5.2.2 Remote Data Transmission.- 5.2.3 Data Checking.- 5.3 Parallel Data Transmission.- 5.3.1 Data Formats.- 5.3.2 Parallel Interface Module.- 5.4 Asynchronous Serial Data Transmission.- 5.4.1 Communications Protocol.- 5.4.2 Data Formats.- 5.4.3 Bit and Character Synchronization.- 5.4.4 Asynchronous Serial Interface Module.- 5.5 Synchronous Serial Data Transmission.- 5.5.1 Bit Synchronization and Character Synchronization.- 5.5.2 Communications Protocols.- 5.5.3 Protocol Layers.- 5.5.4 Synchronous Serial Interface Module.- 6 Input/Output Controllers and Input/Output Computers.- 6.1 Input/Output with Direct Memory Access.- 6.1.1 Types of Accesses.- 6.1.2 DMA Controller Module.- 6.2 Input/Output Computers.- 6.2.1 Multicomputer System with Input/Output Computer.- 6.2.2 Structure of the Input/Output Computer.- 6.3 Controller Modules for Special Functions.- 6.3.1 Floppy Disk.- 6.3.2 Floppy Disk Controller Module.- 6.3.3 Video Terminals.- 6.3.4 CRT Controller Modules.- 7 16-Bit Microprocessors by Motorola, Zilog and Intel.- 7.1 Motorola MC 68000.- 7.1.1 The Programming Model.- 7.1.2 Data Formats.- 7.1.3 Addressing Modes.- 7.1.4 Instruction Formats and Instruction Set.