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A one-stop, comprehensive, and thoroughly updated resource for students, professors, and researchers alikeThoroughly revised and updated, the Third Edition of Supramolecular Chemistry delivers a comprehensive and integrated approach to this rapidly evolving and quickly expanding field. Distinguished professors and authors Jonathan Steed and Jerry Atwood provide readers with a broad and exhaustive resource that assumes little in the way of prior knowledge of supramolecular chemistry.Extensive new content on cutting edge research throughout the field including molecular machines and the…mehr

Produktbeschreibung
A one-stop, comprehensive, and thoroughly updated resource for students, professors, and researchers alikeThoroughly revised and updated, the Third Edition of Supramolecular Chemistry delivers a comprehensive and integrated approach to this rapidly evolving and quickly expanding field. Distinguished professors and authors Jonathan Steed and Jerry Atwood provide readers with a broad and exhaustive resource that assumes little in the way of prior knowledge of supramolecular chemistry.Extensive new content on cutting edge research throughout the field including molecular machines and the mechanical bond, mechanochemistry, halogen bonding, and crystal nucleation accompanies full-color imagery and study problems designed to help students understand and apply the principles introduced within the book. Additional material is provided in the supplementary online resources, including solutions to the student exercises and PowerPoint slides of the figures in the book. Supramolecular Chemistry, Third Edition also includes:* The latest research and developments reported over the last decade* A unique "key references" system that highlights crucial reviews and primary literature* A description of key experimental techniques included in accessible "boxes" for the non-expert* Exercises and problems for students, complete with online solutions* Full-color illustrations and imagery designed to facilitate learning and retention of the key concepts and state-of-the art of the fieldPerfect for undergraduate and postgraduate students taking courses on supramolecular chemistry, the Third Edition of Supramolecular Chemistry also belongs on the bookshelves of all researchers in this, and any closely related, fields. Academics, in particular postdoctoral students and professors, will benefit significantly from this text.
  • Produktdetails
  • Verlag: Wiley / Wiley & Sons
  • Artikelnr. des Verlages: 1W119582510
  • 3. Aufl.
  • Seitenzahl: 1000
  • Erscheinungstermin: 9. August 2021
  • Englisch
  • Abmessung: 254mm x 203mm
  • ISBN-13: 9781119582519
  • ISBN-10: 1119582512
  • Artikelnr.: 60199429
Autorenporträt
Jonathan W. Steed is Professor of Inorganic Chemistry at Durham University. He obtained his Ph.D. at University College London. He is the recipient of the RSC Meldola Medal, Durham's Vice Chancellor's Award for Excellence in Postgraduate Teaching, the Bob Hay Lectureship, and the RSC Corday-Morgan Prize.Jerry L. Atwood is the Curator's Distinguished Professor at the University of Missouri. He obtained his Ph.D. in 1968 at the University of Illinois. He is the co-founder of the journals Supramolecular Chemistry and the Journal of Inclusion Phenomena. He is the recipient of the Izatt-Christiansen Prize in Supramolecular Chemistry.
Inhaltsangabe
About the Authors. Preface to the First Edition. Preface to the Second Edition. Acknowledgements. 1 Concepts. 1.1 Definition and Development of Supramolecular Chemistry. 1.2 Classification of Supramolecular Host
Guest Compounds. 1.3 Receptors, Coordination and the Lock and Key Analogy. 1.4 Binding Constants. 1.5 Cooperativity and the Chelate Effect. 1.6 Preorganisation and Complementarity. 1.7 Thermodynamic and Kinetic Selectivity, and Discrimination. 1.8 Nature of Supramolecular Interactions. 1.9 Solvation and Hydrophobic Effects. 1.10 Supramolecular Concepts and Design. 2 The Supramolecular Chemistry of Life. 2.1 Biological Inspiration for Supramolecular Chemistry. 2.2 Alkali Metal Cations in Biochemistry. 2.3 Porphyrins and Tetrapyrrole Macrocycles. 2.4 Supramolecular Features of Plant Photosynthesis. 2.5 Uptake and Transport of Oxygen by Haemoglobin. 2.6 Enzymes and Coenzymes. 2.7 Neurotransmitters and Hormones. 2.8 Semiochemistry in the Natural World. 2.9 DNA. 2.10 Biochemical Self
Assembly. 3 Cation
Binding Hosts. 3.1 Introduction to Coordination Chemistry. 3.2 The Crown Ethers. 3.3 The Lariat Ethers and Podands. 3.4 The Cryptands. 3.5 The Spherands. 3.6 Nomenclature of Cation
Binding Macrocycles. 3.7 Selectivity of Cation Complexation. 3.8 Solution Behaviour. 3.9 Synthesis: The Template Effect and High Dilution. 3.10 Soft Ligands for Soft Metal Ions. 3.11 Proton Binding: The Simplest Cation. 3.12 Complexation of Organic Cations. 3.13 Alkalides and Electrides. 3.14 The Calixarenes. 3.15 Carbon Donor and À
acid Ligands. 3.16 The Siderophores. 4 Anion Binding. 4.1 Introduction. 4.2 Biological Anion Receptors. 4.3 Concepts in Anion Host Design. 4.4 From Cation Hosts to Anion Hosts
a Simple Change in pH. 4.5 Guanidinium
Based Receptors. 4.6 Neutral Receptors. 4.7 Inert Metal
Containing Receptors. 4.8 Common Core Scaffolds. 5 Ion Pair Receptors. 5.1 Simultaneous Anion and Cation Binding. 5.2 Labile Complexes as Anion Hosts. 5.3 Receptors for Zwitterions. 6 Molecular Guests in Solution. 6.1 Molecular Hosts and Molecular Guests. 6.2 Intrinsic Curvature: Guest Binding by Cavitands. 6.3 Cyclodextrins. 6.4 Molecular Clefts and Tweezers. 6.5 Cyclophane Hosts. 6.6 Constructing a Solution Host from Clathrate
Forming Building Blocks: The Cryptophanes. 6.7 Covalent Cavities: Carcerands and Hemicarcerands. 7 Solid
State Inclusion Compounds. 7.1 Solid
State Host
Guest Compounds. 7.2 Clathrate Hydrates. 7.3 Urea and Thiourea Clathrates. 7.4 Other Channel Clathrates. 7.5 Hydroquinone, Phenol, Dianin's Compound and the Hexahost Strategy. 7.6 Tri
o
thymotide. 7.7 Cyclotriveratrylene. 7.8 Inclusion Compounds of the Calixarenes. 7.9 Solid
Gas and Solid
Liquid Reactions in Molecular Crystals. 8 Crystal Engineering. 8.1 Concepts. 8.2 Crystal Nucleation and Growth. 8.3 Understanding Crystal Structures. 8.4 The Cambridge Structural Database. 8.5 Polymorphism. 8.6 Co
crystals. 8.7 Z' > 1. 8.8 Crystal Structure Prediction. 8.9 Hydrogen Bond Synthons
Common and Exotic. 8.10 Aromatic Rings. 8.11 Halogen Bonding and Other Interactions. 8.12 Crystal Engineering of Diamondoid Arrays. 9 Network Solids. 9.1 What Are Network Solids? 9.2 Zeolites. 9.3 Layered Solids and Intercalates. 9.4 In the Beginning: Hoffman Inclusion Compounds and Werner Clathrates. 9.5 Coordination Polymers. 10 Self
Assembly. 10.1 Introduction. 10.2 Proteins and Foldamers: Single Molecule Self
Assembly. 10.3 Biochemical Self
Assembly. 10.4 Self
Assembly in Synthetic Systems: Kinetic and Thermodynamic Considerations. 10.5 Self
Assembling Coordination Compounds. 10.6 Self
Assembly of Closed Complexes by Hydrogen Bonding. 10.7 Catenanes and Rotaxanes. 10.8 Helicates and Helical Assemblies. 10.9 Molecular Knots. 11 Molecular Devices. 11.1 Introduction. 11.2 Supramolecular Photochemistry. 11.3 Information and Signals: Semiochemistry and Sensing. 11.4 Molecule
Based Electronics. 11.5 Molecular Analogues of Mechanical Machines. 11.6 Nonlinear Optical Materials. 12 Biological Mimics and Supramolecular Catalysis. 12.1 Introduction. 12.2 Cyclodextrins as Enzyme Mimics. 12.3 Corands as ATPase Mimics. 12.4 Cation
Binding Hosts as Transacylase Mimics. 12.5 Metallobiosites. 12.6 Haem Analogues. 12.7 Vitamin B12 Models. 12.8 Ion Channel Mimics. 12.9 Supramolecular Catalysis. 13 Interfaces and Liquid Assemblies. 13.1 Order in Liquids. 13.2 Surfactants and Interfacial Ordering. 13.3 Liquid Crystals. 13.4 Ionic Liquids. 13.5 Liquid Clathrates. 14 Supramolecular Polymers, Gels and Fibres. 14.1 Introduction. 14.2 Dendrimers. 14.3 Covalent Polymers with Supramolecular Properties. 14.4 Self
Assembled Supramolecular Polymers. 14.5 Polycatenanes and Polyrotaxanes. 14.6 Biological Self
Assembled Fibres and Layers. 14.7 Supramolecular Gels. 14.8 Polymeric Liquid Crystals. 15 Nanochemistry. 15.1 When Is Nano Really Nano? 15.2 Nanotechnology: The 'Top Down' and 'Bottom Up' Approaches. 15.3 Templated and Biomimetic Morphosynthesis. 15.4 Nanoscale Photonics. 15.5 Microfabrication, Nanofabrication and Soft Lithography. 15.6 Assembly and Manipulation on the Nanoscale. 15.7 Nanoparticles. 15.8 Endohedral Fullerenes, Nanotubes and Graphene. Summary. Thought Experiment. References. Index.

Concepts
Definition and development of Supramolecular Chemistry
Classification of Supramolecular Host - Guest Compounds
Receptors, Coordination and the Lock and Key Analogy
The Chelate and Macrocyclic Effects
Preorganisation and Complementarity
Thermodynamic and Kinetic Selectivity
Nature of Supramolecular Interactions
The Supramolecular Chemistry of Life
Alkali Metal Cations in Biochemistry
Porphyrins and Tetrapyrrole Macrocycles
Supramolecular Features of Plant of Photosynthesis
Uptake and transport of Oxygen by Haemoglobin
Coenzyme B_12
Neurotransmitters and Hormones
DNA
Biochemical Self Assembly
Viagra(r): Beyond the Hype
Cation-Binding Hosts
The Crown Ethers
Lariat Ethers and Podands
Cryptands
The Spherands
Nomenclature
Solution Behaviour
Selectivity of Cation Complexation
The Macrocyclic, Macrobicyclic and Template Effects
Preorganisation and Complementarity
Soft Ligands for Soft Metal Ions
Complexation of Organic Cations
Alkalides and Electrides
The Calixarenes
Carbon Donor and -acid Ligands
The Siderophones
Binding of Anions
Introduction
Biological Anion Receptors
Concepts in Anion Host Design
From Cation Hosts to Anion Hosts - a Simple Change in pH
Guanidinium-Based Receptors
Organometallic Receptors
Neutral Receptors
Hydride Sponge and Other Lewis Acid Chelates
Anticrowns
Coordination Interactions
Binding of Neutral Molecules
Inorganic Solid-State Clathrate Compounds
Solid-State Clathrates of Organic Hosts
Intracavity Complexes of Neutral Molecules: Solution and Solid-State Binding
Supramolecular Chemistry of the Fullerenes
Crystal Engineering
Concepts
Crystal Structure Prediction
The Cambridge Crystallographic Structural Database
Crystal Engineering of Diamondoid Lattices
Crystal Engineering with Hydrogen Bonds
Hydrogen Bonds to Carbon Monoxide
Weak Hydrogen Bonds
Hydrogen Bonds to Metals and Metal Hydrides
- Stacking
Other Interactions
Awkward Shapes and Mismatch
Coordination Polymers
Biomimetic Structures
Mixed Crystals: Hourglass Inclusions
Templates and Self-Assembly
Introduction
Biochemical Self-Assembly
Self-Assembly in Synthetic Systems: Kinetic and Thermodynamic Considerations
Self-Assembling Coordination Compounds
Self-Assembly of Closed Complexes by Hydrogen Bonding
Catenanes and Rotaxanes
Helicates
Molecular Knots
Catalytic and Self-Replicating Systems
Molecular Devices
Introduction
Supramolecular Photochemistry
Information and Signals: Semiochemistry
Molecular Electronic Devices: Switches, Wires and Rectifiers
Machines Based on Catenanes and Rotaxanes
Nonlinear Optical Materials
Dendrimers
Biological Mimics
Introduction
Characteristics of Enzymes
Cyclodextrins as Enzyme Mimics
Corands as ATPase Mimics
Cation-Binding Hosts as Transacyclase Mimics
Metallobiosites
Haem Analogues
Vitamin B_12 Models
Liquid Interfaces, Liquid Crystals and Liquid Clathrates
Order in Liquids
Surfactants and Interfacial Ordering
Liquid Crystals
Liquid Clathrates
Rezensionen
"...a timely publication...I can thoroughly recommend this book" (Chemistry in Britain, January 2001)

"This is an excellent book...I highly recommend it..." (ChemWeb, 24th January 2001 )

"this book is an excellent reference work for anyone interested in the chemistry of technetium. This book is groundbreaking and will help to foster new courses at university level..." (Applied Organometallic Chemistry, March 2001)

"It brilliantly covers both the breadth and depth of supramolecular chemistry. This is an excellent book, and I highly recommend It.." (The Alchemist, 16th March 2001)

"Steed and Atwood's excellent book is highly recommended as a latter day Rosetta Stone for those students and professional chemists wishing to become fluent in the exciting new language of supramolecular chemistry." (Jnl of Inclusion Phenomena Macrocylic Chemistry, Vol.40 No.327 2001)

"a welcome, timely and valuable publication" (Synthesis, No.3 2002