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In this book, we document and evaluate the recovery of gray wolves (Canis lupus) in the Great Lakes region of the United States. The Great Lakes region is unique in that it was the only portion of the lower 48 states where wolves were never c- pletely extirpated. This region also contains the area where many of the first m- ern concepts of wolf conservation and research where developed. Early proponents of wolf conservation such as Aldo Leopold, Sigurd Olson, and Durward Allen lived and worked in the region. The longest ongoing research on wolf-prey relations (see Vucetich and Peterson, Chap.…mehr

Produktbeschreibung
In this book, we document and evaluate the recovery of gray wolves (Canis lupus) in the Great Lakes region of the United States. The Great Lakes region is unique in that it was the only portion of the lower 48 states where wolves were never c- pletely extirpated. This region also contains the area where many of the first m- ern concepts of wolf conservation and research where developed. Early proponents of wolf conservation such as Aldo Leopold, Sigurd Olson, and Durward Allen lived and worked in the region. The longest ongoing research on wolf-prey relations (see Vucetich and Peterson, Chap. 3) and the first use of radio telemetry for studying wolves (see Mech, Chap. 2) occurred in the Great Lakes region. The Great Lakes region is the first place in the United States where "Endangered" wolf populations recovered. All three states (Minnesota, Wisconsin, and Michigan) developed ecologically and socially sound wolf conservation plans, and the federal government delisted the population of wolves in these states from the United States list of endangered and threatened species on March 12, 2007 (see Refsnider, Chap. 21). Wolf management reverted to the individual states at that time. Although this delisting has since been challenged, we believe that biological recovery of wolves has occurred and anticipate the delisting will be restored. This will be the first case of wolf conservation reverting from the federal government to the state conser- tion agencies in the United States.
  • Produktdetails
  • Verlag: Springer, Berlin
  • Artikelnr. des Verlages: 11939405
  • Erscheinungstermin: April 2009
  • Englisch
  • Abmessung: 241mm x 160mm x 28mm
  • Gewicht: 763g
  • ISBN-13: 9780387859514
  • ISBN-10: 0387859519
  • Artikelnr.: 24877336
Inhaltsangabe
Contents

Preface

Foreword
Bruce Babbitt

Chapter 1 - Early Wolf Research and Conservation in the Great Lakes Region
Curt Meine

Chapter 2 - Long-term Research on Wolves in the Superior National Forest
L. David Mech

Chapter 3 - Wolf and Moose Dynamics on Isle Royale
John A. Vucetich and Rolf O. Peterson

Chapter 4 - An Overview of the Legal History and Population Status of Wolves in Minnesota
John Erb and Michael W. DonCarlos

Chapter 5 - Wolf Population Changes in Michigan
Dean E. Beyer, Jr., Rolf O. Peterson, John A. Vucetich, and James H. Hammill

Chapter 6 - History, Population Growth, and Management of Wolves in Wisconsin
Adrian P. Wydeven, Jane E. Wiedenhoeft, Ronald N. Schultz, Richard P. Thiel, Randle R. Jurewicz, Bruce E. Kohn, and Timothy R. Van Deelen

Chapter 7 - An Isolated Wolf Population in Central Wisconsin
Richard P. Thiel, Wayne Hall, Ellen Heilhecker, and Adrian P. Wydeven

Chapter 8 - Change in Occupied Wolf Habitat in the Northern Great Lakes Region
David J. Mladenoff, Murray K. Clayton, Sarah D. Pratt, Theodore A. Sickley, and Adrian P. Wydeven

Chapter 9 - Growth Rate and Equilibrium Size of a Recolonizing Wolf Population in the Southern Lake Superior Region
Timothy R. Van Deelen

Chapter 10 - Prey of Wolves in the Great Lakes Region
Glenn D. DelGiudice, Keith R. McCaffery, Dean E. Beyer, Jr., and Michael E. Nelson

Chapter 11 - Factors Influencing Homesite Selection of Gray Wolves in Northwestern Wisconsin and East-Central Minnesota
David E. Unger, Paul W. Keenlance, Bruce E. Kohn, and Eric M. Anderson

Chapter 12 - Dispersal of Gray Wolves in the Great Lakes Region
Adrian Treves, Kerry A. Martin, Jane E. Wiedenhoeft, and Adrian P. Wydeven

Chapter 13 - AreWolf-Mediated Trophic Cascades Boosting Biodiversity in the Great Lakes Region?
Tom Rooney and Dean Anderson

Chapter 14 - Wolves, Roads, and Highway Development
Bruce E. Kohn, Eric M. Anderson, and Richard P. Thiel

Chapter 15 - Taxonomy, Morphology, and Genetics of Wolves of the Great Lakes Region
Ronald M. Nowak

Chapter 16 - Human Dimensions: Public Opinion Research Concerning Wolves in the Great Lakes States of Michigan, Minnesota, and Wisconsin
Kevin Schanning

Chapter 17 - Ma'iingan and the Ojibwe
Peter David

Chapter 18 - Wolf-Human Conflicts and Management in Minnesota, Wisconsin, and Michigan
David B. Ruid, William J. Paul, Brian J. Roell, Adrian P. Wydeven, Robert C. Willging, Randy L. Jurewicz, and Donald H. Lonsway

Chapter 19, Education and Outreach Efforts on Wolves in the Great Lakes Region
Pamela S. Troxell, Karlyn Atkinson Berg, Holly Jaycox, Andrea Lorek Strauss, Peggy Struhsacker, and Peggy Callahan

Chapter 20 - The Role of the Endangered Species Act in Midwest Wolf Recovery
Ron Refsnider

Chapter 21 - Wolf Recovery in the Great Lakes Region: What Have We Learned, and Where Do We Go Now?
Adrian P. Wydeven, Timothy R. Van Deelen, and Edward J. Heske

Index
Rezensionen
From the reviews:

"This book documents and evaluates the recovery of the gray wolf in the Great Lakes Region, where modern concepts of wolf conservation developed. Twenty-three chapters written by numerous wolf biologists cover all aspects of the recovery effort, starting with early history, research, and conservation in this area. ... This book provides a model for future recovery efforts and the management of wolf populations, as well as of large predators. Summing Up: Recommended. All general, academic, and professional audiences." (R. L. Smith, Choice, Vol. 47 (2), October, 2009)
"Each chapter reads like a scientific paper that addresses its topic with scholarly thoroughness. ... The chapters are essentially research papers written by scientists for other scientists. Anyone who can read a newspaper can understand most of this material ... . In short, this book is a serious attempt to understand a major topic in wolf restoration. This compilation of scholarship is likely to be the most authoritative and carefully researched book on the topic for a long time to come." (Steve Grooms, International Wolf, Spring, 2010)