Bode's Law and the Discovery of Juno - Cunningham, Clifford J.
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Johann Bode developed a so-called law of planetary distances best known as Bode's Law. The story of the discovery of Juno in 1804 by Karl Harding tells how Juno fit into that scheme and is examined as it relates to the philosopher Georg Hegel's 1801 thesis that there could be no planets between Mars and Jupiter. By 1804 that gap was not only filled but had three residents: Ceres, Pallas and Juno!
When Juno was discovered no one could have imagined its study would call into question Newton's law of gravity, or be the impetus for developing the mathematics of the fast Fourier transform by
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Produktbeschreibung
Johann Bode developed a so-called law of planetary distances best known as Bode's Law. The story of the discovery of Juno in 1804 by Karl Harding tells how Juno fit into that scheme and is examined as it relates to the philosopher Georg Hegel's 1801 thesis that there could be no planets between Mars and Jupiter. By 1804 that gap was not only filled but had three residents: Ceres, Pallas and Juno!

When Juno was discovered no one could have imagined its study would call into question Newton's law of gravity, or be the impetus for developing the mathematics of the fast Fourier transform by Carl Gauss. Clifford Cunningham, a dedicated scholar, opens to scrutiny this critical moment of astronomical discovery, continuing the story of asteroid begun in earlier volumes of this series.

The fascinating issues raised by the discovery of Juno take us on an extraordinary journey. The revelation of the existence of this new class of celestial bodies transformed our understanding of the Solar System, the implications of which are thoroughly discussed in terms of Romantic Era science, philosophy, poetry, mathematics and astronomy.

The account given here is based on both English and foreign correspondence and scientific papers, most of which are translated for the first time.
Autorenporträt
Clifford J. Cunningham did his Ph.D. work in the history of astronomy at James Cook University and the University of Southern Queensland in Australia, and he is affiliated with the National Astronomical Research Institute of Thailand. He has written or edited 13 books on the history of astronomy, and his papers have been published in many major journals, including Annals of Science, Journal for the History of Astronomy, Culture & Cosmos, Journal of Astronomical History and Heritage, Studia Etymologica Cracoviensia, The Asian Journal of Physics and The Milton Quarterly. Asteroid (4276) was named Clifford in his honor by the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics.
Inhaltsangabe
Preface.- Hegel, Bode's Law and the Missing Planet.- The Discovery of Juno.- Juno: A Driving Force for Change.- The Music of Spheres.- The Big Four Asteroids in Verse.- Letters: Bessel with Gauss and Olbers.- The Gauss-Olbers Letters.- The Harding-Gauss Letters.- Letters: Gauss with Bode and Zach.- The Oriani-Piazzi Letters.- Schroeter's Asteroid Book.- Scientific Papers on Juno.- The Astronomical Instruments.- The Observatories.- Appendix 1: The 1802 Hungarian Letter of Antal Decsy.- Appendix 2: The Historical Development of the Orbital Elements of Juno.- References.- Index.
Rezensionen
"What I like about this book is its comprehensive nature and its thoroughness. Very, very little is left out. Anyone who deemed to mention the asteroid Juno in the early decades of the 19th Century is in, referenced, illustrated, described, translated into English, and quoted in full. We get the science, the research papers, ... of the observers and thinkers, and descriptions of their observatories and instruments. The book is a fount of information and a joy." (David W. Hughes, The Observatory, Vol. 138 (1266), October, 2018)