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"Succinct and readable . . . a helpful guidebook for general readers as well as tourists who plan to visit Indian communities and reservations." Journal of the West This book provides in a useful format the basic information about American Indians that every tourist and armchair traveler might need or want. Part One is a brief account of the many different tribes in the lower forty-eight states, detailing their cultures and lifeways, their relations with the federal government, the pan-Indian movement, and contemporary writings and journalism. Part Two offers helpful advice about visiting…mehr

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"Succinct and readable . . . a helpful guidebook for general readers as well as tourists who plan to visit Indian communities and reservations." Journal of the West This book provides in a useful format the basic information about American Indians that every tourist and armchair traveler might need or want. Part One is a brief account of the many different tribes in the lower forty-eight states, detailing their cultures and lifeways, their relations with the federal government, the pan-Indian movement, and contemporary writings and journalism. Part Two offers helpful advice about visiting reservations and guidance in interpreting ceremonials and dances, buying art and craftwork, and camping on Indian lands. Part Three is a detailed, region-by-region guide to the tribes and reservations, campgrounds, and regularly scheduled events. Special sections list museums with important collections of Indian art, crafts, and artifacts; organizations interested in Indian affairs; and publications devoted to tribal interests. There is also a carefully selected list of readings for those who would like to know more about America's first citizens. The book is lavishly illustrated with photographs and maps designed to aid the traveler who visits Indian Country. Arnold Marquis, a playwright, producer, and director, pursued his interest in the American Indian over more than thirty years, traveling the land, attending ceremonials, visiting reservations, camping with the Indians, and gaining a firsthand acquaintance with the tribes. His film series The Only Good Indian won the UCLA Award and is now in the National Archives.