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  • Broschiertes Buch

Given the fact that there are perhaps 400 billion stars in our Galaxy alone, and perhaps 400 billion galaxies in the Universe, it stands to reason that somewhere out there, in the 14-billion-year-old cosmos, there is or once was a civilization at least as advanced as our own. The sheer enormity of the numbers almost demands that we accept the truth of this hypothesis. Why, then, have we encountered no evidence, no messages, no artifacts of these extraterrestrials? In this second, significantly revised and expanded edition of his widely popular book, Webb discusses in detail the (for now!) 75…mehr

Produktbeschreibung
Given the fact that there are perhaps 400 billion stars in our Galaxy alone, and perhaps 400 billion galaxies in the Universe, it stands to reason that somewhere out there, in the 14-billion-year-old cosmos, there is or once was a civilization at least as advanced as our own. The sheer enormity of the numbers almost demands that we accept the truth of this hypothesis. Why, then, have we encountered no evidence, no messages, no artifacts of these extraterrestrials? In this second, significantly revised and expanded edition of his widely popular book, Webb discusses in detail the (for now!) 75 most cogent and intriguing solutions to Fermi's famous paradox: If the numbers strongly point to the existence of extraterrestrial civilizations, why have we found no evidence of them?Reviews from the first edition:"Amidst the plethora of books that treat the possibility of extraterrestrial intelligence, this one by Webb ... is outstanding. ... Each solution is presented in a very logical, interesting, thorough manner with accompanying explanations and notes that the intelligent layperson can understand. Webb digs into the issues ... by considering a very broad set of in-depth solutions that he addresses through an interesting and challenging mode of presentation that stretches the mind. ... An excellent book for anyone who has ever asked 'Are we alone?'." (W. E. Howard III, Choice, March, 2003)"Fifty ideas are presented ... that reveal a clearly reasoned examination of what is known as 'The Fermi Paradox'. ... For anyone who enjoys a good detective story, or using their thinking faculties and stretching the imagination to the limits ... 'Where is everybody' will be enormously informative and entertaining. ... Read this book, and whatever your views are about life elsewhere in the Universe, your appreciation for how special life is here on Earth will be enhanced! A worthy addition to any personal library." (Philip Bridle, BBC Radio, March, 2003)Since gaining a BSc in physics from the University of Bristol and a PhD in theoretical physics from the University of Manchester, Stephen Webb has worked in a variety of universities in the UK. He is a regular contributor to the Yearbook of Astronomy series and has published an undergraduate textbook on distance determination in astronomy and cosmology as well as several popular science books. His interest in the Fermi paradox combines lifelong interests in both science and science fiction.
  • Produktdetails
  • Science and Fiction
  • Verlag: Springer / Springer, Berlin
  • Artikelnr. des Verlages: 978-3-319-13235-8
  • 2. Aufl.
  • Seitenzahl: 452
  • Erscheinungstermin: 29. Mai 2015
  • Englisch
  • Abmessung: 235mm x 155mm x 24mm
  • Gewicht: 712g
  • ISBN-13: 9783319132358
  • ISBN-10: 3319132350
  • Artikelnr.: 41615624
Autorenporträt
Physicist Stephen Webb is best known as author of popular science books: he has published 'Measuring the Universe - The Cosmological Distance Ladder'  in 1999, the first edition of 'If the Universe Is Teeming with Aliens ... WHERE IS EVERYBODY? Fifty Solutions to the Fermi Paradox and the Problem of Extraterrestrial Life' in 2002, 'Out of this World - Colliding Universes, Branes, Strings, and Other Wild Ideas of Modern Physics' in 2004 and 'New Eyes on the Universe - Twelve Cosmic Mysteries and the Tools We Need to Solve Them' in 2012.
Inhaltsangabe
Foreword.- Preface to the Second Edition.- Preface to the Third Edition.- Where is Everybody?.- Of Fermi and Paradox.- They are (or were) Here.- They Exist, But we Have Yet to See or Hear From Them.- They Don`t Exist.- Conclusion.- Notes.- References.- Index.

Rezensionen
From the reviews:"Webb offers coherent, understandable, and sometimes humorous coverage of a diverse range of topics. He provides readers with non-trivial insights into research fields they may not have encountered previously . . . I think everyone who has ever considered the possibility that other intelligent civilizations exist elsewhere within our galaxy will enjoy Where Is Everybody? They will find much to agree with, and much to argue about, in this very accessible volume." - Science"Where Is Everybody? is a delightful mental romp. With a light-hearted, enthusiastic tone, Webb offers lively coverage of UFOs, crop circles, and the books of Erich von Däniken, the infamous proponent of the idea that aliens visited the Earth in the distant past. Science-fiction fans will enjoy the frequent references to Star Trek, and science buffs will appreciate mention of the ideas of Carl Sagan, Fred Hoyle, Frank Drake, and Freeman Dyson. This book is a must-read for anyone who has ever pondered the question, "Are we alone?"-Astronomy"There have been many attempts to resolve the Fermi paradox, and Stephen Webb.. presents his favorites in compelling detail... [he] writes informatively - even authoritatively... His writing is encyclopedic in scope, lucid, often poetic - and in the end is both enormously inspiring and a little sad if he is right, as I'm afraid he might be, in concluding that we are the only advanced civilization in the Galaxy. Readers are free to differ with Webb's conclusion, but they will be surprised to learn how convincing it is."I have read a number of good astronomy books this past year, but this is the one I regard as indispensable. If I were Robinson Crusoe - shipwrecked and lonely on an island in space -- I would want this book with me."MERCURY Magazine (published by the Astronomical Society of the Pacific)"Stephen Webb provides a fascinating a guide to the rousing scientific debate over the existence of extraterrestrial life in Where Is Everybody? Fifty Solutions to the Fermi Paradox and the Problem of Extraterrestrial Life ... . The reader of the book will get a very broad education in many basic fields of science, including astronomy, biology, chemistry, geology, meteorology and even psychology. Webb is clear, entertaining and fair to every one of the 50 opinions, and even gives his own solutions in a concluding chapter." (Jeffrey Marsh, Washington Times, January, 2003)"Physicist Stephen Webb examines 49 hypotheses and theories that attempt to solve the Fermi Paradox and offers his own explanation in this fascinating survey of the opinions of astronomers, physicists and philosophers. ... Where is Everybody? is engrossing and thought-provoking, a science book that every fan of science fiction should read." (Mark Graham, Rocky Mountains News, December, 2002)"Amidst the plethora of books that treat the possibility of extraterrestrial intelligence, this one by Webb ... is outstanding. ... Each solution is presented in a very logical, interesting, thorough manner with accompanying explanations and notes that the intelligent layperson can understand. Webb digs into the issues ... by considering a very broad set of in-depth solutions that he addresses through an interesting and challenging mode of presentation that stretches the mind. ... An excellent book for anyone who has ever asked 'Are we alone?'." (W. E. Howard III, Choice, March, 2003)"'Where is everybody?' ... The question encapsulates what is now known as the Fermi paradox. Webb, lecturer in physics at the Open University in England, presents 49 solutions that have been proposed for the paradox, grouping them according to whether they hold that intelligent extraterrestrials are here, exist but have not communicated, or do not exist. He makes a splendid and enlightening story of it, concluding with his own solution, the 50th: 'We are alone'." (Scientific American, June, 2003)"In response to Enrico Fermi's famous 1950 question concerning…mehr