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This book brings new scientific methods to intelligence research that is still under the influence of 19th century single causal theory and method. The author describes a rigorous and exhaustive classification of natural intelligence while demonstrating a more adequate scientific and mathematical approach than current statistical and psychometric approaches construct to shore up the out-dated and misused IQ hypothetical. The author demonstrates the superiority of a highly developed multidisciplinary-theory models view of intelligence. …mehr

Produktbeschreibung
This book brings new scientific methods to intelligence research that is still under the influence of 19th century single causal theory and method. The author describes a rigorous and exhaustive classification of natural intelligence while demonstrating a more adequate scientific and mathematical approach than current statistical and psychometric approaches construct to shore up the out-dated and misused IQ hypothetical. The author demonstrates the superiority of a highly developed multidisciplinary-theory models view of intelligence.
  • Produktdetails
  • Verlag: Springer / Springer Netherlands
  • Artikelnr. des Verlages: 11777137
  • Erscheinungstermin: 18. Oktober 2006
  • Englisch
  • Abmessung: 242mm x 162mm x 27mm
  • Gewicht: 712g
  • ISBN-13: 9781402052750
  • ISBN-10: 1402052758
  • Artikelnr.: 20946760
Autorenporträt
Myrna Lynne Estep holds the B.A., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees from Indiana University, Bloomington, where she also taught and where much of the research for this book was originally done. She has also held faculty positions at the University of Zimbabwe; a branch of the University of Texas; and held various professional positions with the U.S. Government. She is the author of numerous scientific and technological papers, two books, co-editor of another, and has conducted studies in social and political theory affecting women, minorities, and the poor. Her biography appears in numerous reference books including The Directory of American Scholars; various editions of the Marquis Who's Who and Who's Who in Science and Engineering. She was elected a member of the Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi in 1992, and is an active researcher and writer in the behavioral sciences and artificial intelligence. Along with her husband, philosopher-scientist Richard Schoenig, she spends much of her time in West Texas and in the high San Juan Mountains of southwest Colorado.
Inhaltsangabe
Dedication. Introduction. List of Abbreviations. List of Figures and Tables. Acknowledgements. 1. The Problem of Intelligence. 1.1 Some of the Basic Issues. 1.2. The Faulty Sciences of Intelligence. 1.2.1 The Anti-Theory Bias. 1.2.2 Invalid Reductionism. 1.2.3 Neglect of Emerging Intelligence. 1.2.4 Neglect of Theory Construction and Concept Formation. 1.2.5 Unexamined Assumptions, Concepts, and Fallacies. 1.2.6 A Bankrupt Theory of Knowing in the Sciences of Intelligence. 1.2.7 A Missing Distinction between Rule-governed and Rule-bound Intelligence. 1.2.8 Neglect of Multiple Signs and Disclosure of Intelligence. 1.2.9 Mechanical 'Hard-Wired' and Natural Intelligence: Absent the Difference. 1.3 Requirements for a New Science of Intelligence. 1.3.1 A Broader Theory of Knowing. 1.3.2 A Broader Theory of Signs of Intelligence. 1.3.3 Methods of Nonlinear Science: The Emergence of Self-Organizing Dynamical Intelligence. 1.4 Summary. 2. The Universe of Intelligence. 2.1 Carving the Problem Space. 2.1.1 Rational Inquiry and Ideology: The Differences. 2.1.2 Careless Carving. 2.2 Classical Origins of Fabric of Intelligence Theory: Cut on Biases. 2.2.1 Plato and Aristotle's Conflicting Theoretical Stage. 2.2.2 Anthropocentrism, Language, Gender, Race, Size, Wealth, and Place. 2.2.3 The Fabric of Concepts Defining Intelligence Since Darwin. 2.3 Today's IQ Tests: Circularity, Bias, and American Eugenics. 2.3.1 The Economic Argument. 2.3.2 Reification and the Eugenics Argument. 2.3.3 A Static Hierarchy: g the Controller. 2.3.4 Biological Determinism Revisited. 2.4 Summary. 3. The Genesis of Intelligence: Innate and Emergence Arguments. 3.1 Categorization, Classification, Concepts and Representation. 3.1.1 Reality and the Influence of Representationalism. 3.2 The Continuing Problem with Universais (Concepts): Some History. 3.2.1 Realists, Conceptualists, and Nominalists on Universais. 3.2.2 Theories of Knowledge and the Scope ofIntelligence. 3.2.3 Today's Representationalist Myths: Cognitive Maps in the Brain. 3.3 The Innate Versus Emergence Arguments. 3.3.1 The Genetically Encoded Syntax Argument. 3.3.2 Nonverbal Communication: Beyond Alphanumeric Symbols and Vocalizations. 3.3.3 Evolutionary Argument against Innatists. 3.3.4 Cognitivism, Mechanism, and 'Innateness': How the Mind Does Not Work. 3.4 Summary. 4. The Intelligence of Doing: Sensorimotor Domains and Knowing How. 4.1 The Intelligence of Doing. 4.1.1 A Two-Pronged Approach to Intelligence Inquiry. 4.1.2 Cognition, Consciousness, Awareness. 4.2 The Science of Awareness. 4.2.1 Cortical Structures and Information: Neural Bases of Awareness and Intelligent Doing. 4.2.2 How Concepts (Universals) Get Formed: A Global Map Theory. 4.2.3 Primitive Awareness. 4.2.4 Experimental Evidence of Immediate Awareness. 4.2.5 Primitives of the Preattentive Phase of Awareness. 4.3. Primitive Intelligence of Moving and Touching. 4.3.1 Multiple Spaces of the Senses, Images and Probing. 4.3.2 Smoothness and