Winona: A Tale of Negro Life - Hopkins, Pauline E.
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Winona: A Tale of Negro Life in the South and Southwest (19902-1903) is a novel by African American author Pauline Elizabeth Hopkins. Originally published in The Colored American Magazine, America's first monthly periodical covering African American arts and culture, Winona: A Tale of Negro Life in the South and Southwest is a groundbreaking novel that addresses themes of race and colonization from the perspective of a young girl of mixed descent. As white settlers moved westward across North America, they not only displaced the indigenous population, but brought into contact peoples from…mehr

Produktbeschreibung
Winona: A Tale of Negro Life in the South and Southwest (19902-1903) is a novel by African American author Pauline Elizabeth Hopkins. Originally published in The Colored American Magazine, America's first monthly periodical covering African American arts and culture, Winona: A Tale of Negro Life in the South and Southwest is a groundbreaking novel that addresses themes of race and colonization from the perspective of a young girl of mixed descent. As white settlers moved westward across North America, they not only displaced the indigenous population, but brought into contact peoples from opposite ends of Earth. On an island in the middle of Lake Erie, White Eagle--recently displaced after the dissolution of the Buffalo Creek reservation--has built a home for himself and his African American wife. Adopting her son Judah, White Eagle establishes a life for his family apart from the prejudices and violence of American life. A daughter, Winona, is born soon after, and grows to be proud of her rich cultural heritage. When two white hunters stumble upon the island, however, and when White Eagle is soon found dead, his family is left to the mercy of an uncaring, hostile nation. Winona: A Tale of Negro Life in the South and Southwest is a heartbreaking work of historical fiction from a true pioneer of American literature, a woman whose talent and principles afforded her the vision necessary for illuminating the injustices of life in a nation founded on slavery and genocide. With a beautifully designed cover and professionally typeset manuscript, this edition of Pauline Elizabeth Hopkins' Winona: A Tale of Negro Life in the South and Southwest is a classic work of African American literature reimagined for modern readers.
  • Produktdetails
  • Mint Editions
  • Verlag: MINT ED
  • Seitenzahl: 122
  • Erscheinungstermin: 10. August 2021
  • Englisch
  • Abmessung: 209mm x 132mm x 10mm
  • Gewicht: 235g
  • ISBN-13: 9781513208336
  • ISBN-10: 1513208330
  • Artikelnr.: 62118873
Autorenporträt
Pauline E. Hopkins (1859-1930) was an African American novelist, playwright, and historian. Born in Portland, Maine, Hopkins was raised in Boston by her mother and adopted father. Supported in her academic pursuits from a young age, Hopkins excelled at Girls High School, where she won a local competition for her essay on the raising of children. In 1877, she began her career as a dramatist with a production in Saratoga, which encouraged her to write a musical entitled Slaves' Escape; or, The Underground Railroad (1880). In 1900, she published "Talma Gordon," now considered the first mystery story written by an African American author. Having established herself as a professional writer, she published three serial novels in the periodical The Colored American Magazine, including Hagar's Daughter: A Story of Southern Caste Prejudice (1901-1902) and Winona: A Tale of Negro Life in the South and Southwest (1902-1903). Often compared to her contemporaries Charles Chestnutt and Paul Laurence Dunbar, Hopkins made a name for herself as a successful and ambitious author who advocated for the rights of African Americans at a time of intense violence and widespread oppression.