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Booker Taliaferro Washington (1856-1915) was an American author, orator, educator, and adviser to numerous U.S. Presidents. He belonged to the last generation of Black Americans born into slavery and became a prominent mouthpiece for ex-slaves and their descendants. "Up from Slavery" is Washington's 1901 autobiography, within which he recounts his astonishing journey from slave child during the Civil War to presidential advisor and leading political figure. Highly recommended for those with an interest in American history and the abolitionist movement. Contents include: "A Slave Among Slaves",…mehr

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Booker Taliaferro Washington (1856-1915) was an American author, orator, educator, and adviser to numerous U.S. Presidents. He belonged to the last generation of Black Americans born into slavery and became a prominent mouthpiece for ex-slaves and their descendants. "Up from Slavery" is Washington's 1901 autobiography, within which he recounts his astonishing journey from slave child during the Civil War to presidential advisor and leading political figure. Highly recommended for those with an interest in American history and the abolitionist movement. Contents include: "A Slave Among Slaves", "Boyhood Days", "The Struggle for an Education", "Helping Others", "The Reconstruction Period", "Black Race and Red Race", "Early Days at Tuskegee", "Teaching School in a Stable and a Hen-House", "Anxious Days and Sleepless Nights", etc. Other notable works by this author include: "The Future of the American Negro" (1899), "Character Building" (1902), and "Working with the Hands" (1904). Read & Co. History is proud to be republishing this classic memoir now in a new edition complete with a specially-commissioned new biography of the author.

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Booker Taliaferro Washington (April 18, 1856 - November 14, 1915) was an American educator, author, orator, and adviser to multiple presidents of the United States. Between 1890 and 1915, Washington was the dominant leader in the African American community and of the contemporary black elite.[1] Washington was from the last generation of black American leaders born into slavery and became the leading voice of the former slaves and their descendants. They were newly oppressed in the South by disenfranchisement and the Jim Crow discriminatory laws enacted in the post-Reconstruction Southern states in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Washington was a key proponent of African-American businesses and one of the founders of the National Negro Business League. His base was the Tuskegee Institute, a historically black college in Tuskegee, Alabama. As lynchings in the South reached a peak in 1895, Washington gave a speech, known as the "Atlanta compromise", which brought him national fame. He called for black progress through education and entrepreneurship, rather than trying to challenge directly the Jim Crow segregation and the disenfranchisement of black voters in the South. Washington mobilized a nationwide coalition of middle-class blacks, church leaders, and white philanthropists and politicians, with a long-term goal of building the community's economic strength and pride by a focus on self-help and schooling. With his own contributions to the black community, Washington was a supporter of Racial uplift. But, secretly, he also supported court challenges to segregation and restrictions on voter registration.[2] Black activists in the North, led by W. E. B. Du Bois, at first supported the Atlanta compromise, but later disagreed and opted to set up the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) to work for political change. They tried with limited success to challenge Washington's political machine for leadership in the black community, but built wider networks among white allies in the North.[3] Decades after Washington's death in 1915, the civil rights movement of the 1950s took a more active and progressive approach, which was also based on new grassroots organizations based in the South, such as Congress of Racial Equality (CORE), the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) and Southern Christian Leadership Conference