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The Labour Party, founded in 1912 by James Connolly and Jim Larkin, was initially the political voice for the trade union movement. This is clearly reflected in the early history of the Party in Cork. Founded in turbulent times, it was a number of years before structures emerged with the local elections of 1920 being the first elections contested by the Party in Cork. The book examines the history of elections contested between 1920 and 1948, the key personalities during this period, the organisational structure that saw the change from trade union organisation to the development of over 120…mehr

Produktbeschreibung
The Labour Party, founded in 1912 by James Connolly and Jim Larkin, was initially the political voice for the trade union movement. This is clearly reflected in the early history of the Party in Cork. Founded in turbulent times, it was a number of years before structures emerged with the local elections of 1920 being the first elections contested by the Party in Cork. The book examines the history of elections contested between 1920 and 1948, the key personalities during this period, the organisational structure that saw the change from trade union organisation to the development of over 120 Labour branches by the 1940s. The revolutionary period was followed by a period of economic and social conservatism. In Cork, the Party fought consistently for the poorest in society on socio-economic issues rather than focussing on the national question. Its character was firmly rooted in an Irish dimension with little or no external political influences shaping its development in Cork. What emerged was a form of Catholic socialism rather than any European or Marxist ideology. Indeed, much of the period was spent rejecting any allegations of being communist. The opinions of both public representatives but also the Party membership at meetings of the organisation on issues of the day are reviewed. Key incidents are covered. The party members who participated in the Cork Soviet in 1920, the expulsion of a Labour TD for supporting public safety legislation, refusal of a Labour Lord Mayor to greet a Nazi warship in Cork Harbour and the expulsion of Michael O'Riordan from the Party and who subsequently became General Secretary of the Communist Party of Ireland.