C++ for Lazy Programmers (eBook, PDF) - Briggs, Will
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Learn C++ the quick, easy, and "lazy" way. This book is an introductory programming text that uses humor and fun to make you actually willing to read, and eager to do the projects -- with the popular C++ language. C++ for Lazy Programmers is a genuinely fun learning experience that will show you how to create programs in the C++ language. This book helps you learn the C++ language with a unique method that goes beyond syntax and how-to manuals and helps you understand how to be a productive programmer. It provides detailed help with both the Visual Studio and g++ compilers plus their…mehr

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Produktbeschreibung
Learn C++ the quick, easy, and "lazy" way. This book is an introductory programming text that uses humor and fun to make you actually willing to read, and eager to do the projects -- with the popular C++ language.
C++ for Lazy Programmers is a genuinely fun learning experience that will show you how to create programs in the C++ language. This book helps you learn the C++ language with a unique method that goes beyond syntax and how-to manuals and helps you understand how to be a productive programmer. It provides detailed help with both the Visual Studio and g++ compilers plus their debuggers, and includes the latest version of the language, C++17, too.
Along the way you'll work through a number of labs: projects intended to stretch your abilities, test your new skills, and build confidence. You'll go beyond the basics of the language and learn how build a fun C++ arcade game project. After reading and using this book, you'll be ready for your first real-world C++ application or game project on your own.
What You Will Learn
  • Program for the first time in C++ in a fun, quick and easy manner
  • Discover the SDL graphics and gaming library
  • Work with SSDL, the Simple SDLwrapper library
  • Use the most common C++ compilers: Visual Studio, and g++ (with Unix or MinGW)
  • Practice "anti-bugging" for easy fixes to common problems
  • Work with the debugger
  • Acquire examples-driven concepts and ideas
  • Build a C++-based arcade game application
  • Apply built-in Standard Template Library (STL) functions and classes for easy and efficient programming
  • Dip your toe in C, C++'s ancestor, still extensively used in industry
  • Use new C++11/14/17 features including lambda functions, constexpr, and smart pointers
Who This Book Is For
Those who are new to C++, either as a guide for self-learners or as an accessible textbook for students in college-level courses.

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  • Produktdetails
  • Verlag: Springer-Verlag GmbH
  • Erscheinungstermin: 02.10.2019
  • Englisch
  • ISBN-13: 9781484251874
  • Artikelnr.: 57872281
Autorenporträt
Will Briggs, PhD is a professor of computer science at the University of Lynchburg in Virginia. He has 20+ years of experience teaching C++, 12 of them using earlier drafts of this book, and about as many years teaching other languages including C, LISP, Pascal, PHP, PROLOG, and Python. His primary focus is teaching of late while also active in research in artificial intelligence.
Inhaltsangabe
The text is around 120,000 words long. Most chapters take one week each to cover in a standard (3- or 4-hour) college class. It covers two semesters, with a few extra chapters at the end for those wanting to go further. Chapter 1-13 are for semester one , covering variables, constants, types including enumeration types, control structures, functions, standard I/O, programming style, algorithm development, and the debugger. The climax of the sequence is Chapter 12, Building Your Own Arcade Game. As it stands now, all but Chapter 13 use a graphics library for whiz-bang. Chapter 14-23 are for the second semester , covering character arrays, pointers and dynamic memory, classes, inheritance, templates including the Standard Template Library, exceptions, virtual functions, and elementary data structures (strings, stacks, queues, vectors, and lists). The climax of this sequence is the construction of linked lists. Only Chapter 21 uses graphics -- the rest use standard console I/O, which is essential before going on to subsequent classes in the major. Chapters 24-29 are optional extras : namespaces, construction of libraries, history of C++, bit twiddling, sstream, shared_ptr, the C language, and other topics. Appendices cover setting up the graphics library on your machine, escape sequences, keywords, standard libraries, g++ debugger commands, and graphics-library functions. Introduction. 1-1 1 Getting started. 1-9 1.1 A simple program.. 1-9 1.2 Creating an SSDL project 1-12 1.3 Shapes, and the functions that draw them.. 1-27 1.4 consts and colors. 1-35 1.5 Text 1-37 First week. Prominent examples from this chapter: a drawing of a bug's head; a neatly printed poem. 2 Images and sound. 2-43 2.1 Images, and changing window characteristics. 2-43 2.2 Multiple images together 2-48 2.3 Sound. 2-51 Second week. Example: a slide show (Your yard gnome's travel pics). 3 Math: types, operations, consts, and math functions. 3-55 3.1 Variables, constants, enums as constants. 3-55 3.2 Math operators. 3-57 3.3 Mathematical functions. 3-61 Third week. Examples: diver on a diving board; a 5-pointed star. 4 Mouse, and if. 4-67 4.1 Mouse functions, and variables associated. 4-67 4.2 if.. 4-69 4.3 Boolean variables. 4-73 4.4 Where Waldo is: using mouse input 4-75 Fourth week. Example: Where's Waldo? (pending approval from Waldo's author). 5 Loops and text input 5-79 5.1 Text input 5-79 5.2 while and do-while. 5-81 5.3 for-loops. 5-85 5.4 The char type, and cctype.. 5-90 5.5 switch.. 5-94 Fifth week. Examples: the Monty Hall problem; menus. 6 Algorithms and the development process. 6-97 6.1 The Biscuit Algorithm, or how planning ahead reduces your workload. 6-97 6.2 Writing a program, from start to finish. 6-100 Sixth week. 7 Functions. Example: a multi-panel comic. 7-106 7.1 Functions that return values. 7-106 7.2 Functions that return nothing. 7-110 7.3 Why have functions, anyway?. 7-117 Still sixth week. Example: a multi-frame comic (illustrates code reuse). 8 Functions (cont'd). Example: various random functions. 8-126 8.1 Boolean functions. 8-126 8.2 Random numbers. 8-127 8.3 Multiple values provided: using & parameters. 8-133 8.4 Identifier scope 8-138 8.5 A final note on algorithms. 8-140 Seventh and eighth weeks. Examples: various functions using random number generation. 9 Using the debugger (optional, recommended) 9-141 9.1 Example: drawing a flag. 9-141 9.2 A debugger session in Visual Studio. 9-145 9.3 Debugging g++ programs with ddd and gdb. 9-150 9.4 Other common debugging techniques. 9-156 Ninth week. 10 enum and arrays. 10-159 10.1 Enumeration types. 10-159 10.2 Arrays. 10-160 10.3 Multidimensional arrays. 10-166 Tenth week. Examples: checkers, tic-tac-