The Grammaticalization of Verbs. Verbs as Sources of Grammatical Change - Bobik, Melanie
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Research Paper (undergraduate) from the year 2004 in the subject English Language and Literature Studies - Linguistics, grade: 1,3, Free University of Berlin (Anglistik), language: English, abstract: The famous dictum, "grammars code best what speakers do most" coined by Du Bois, is a central postulate of all discourse-based approaches to grammaticalization (also known as grammaticization, grammatization). It points to the assumption that frequent repetition in discourse plays a crucial role in the development of grammatical forms, and that basicness is an inherent characteristics of most…mehr

Produktbeschreibung
Research Paper (undergraduate) from the year 2004 in the subject English Language and Literature Studies - Linguistics, grade: 1,3, Free University of Berlin (Anglistik), language: English, abstract: The famous dictum, "grammars code best what speakers do most" coined by Du Bois, is a central postulate of all discourse-based approaches to grammaticalization (also known as grammaticization, grammatization). It points to the assumption that frequent repetition in discourse plays a crucial role in the development of grammatical forms, and that basicness is an inherent characteristics of most source concepts.There is only a limited number of lexical items likely to be sources for grammaticalization. Since verbs form the core element of every sentence, expressing different conditions such as states, changes and activities, they provide a rich source for grammatical targets.So how do verbs serve as a source of grammatical change? This academic paper gives answers to this question, discussing the grammaticalization of verbs, and how verbs typically evolve into prepositions, aspectual as well as quotative markers, and complementizers. Evidence is taken not only from English, but also from, i.a., Chinese, German, Spanish, French and African languages.
  • Produktdetails
  • Verlag: GRIN Verlag
  • Seitenzahl: 120
  • Erscheinungstermin: 13. Januar 2019
  • Englisch
  • Abmessung: 210mm x 148mm x 8mm
  • Gewicht: 185g
  • ISBN-13: 9783668867338
  • ISBN-10: 366886733X
  • Artikelnr.: 55002212
Inhaltsangabe
1. Introduction2. Grammaticalization and its Meaning3. Where Does Grammar Come From?4. Characteristics of Grammaticalization5. Motivations for Grammaticalization6. From Source to Target: Basicness as Relevance Factor7. Auxiliary Verbs7.1. Auxiliation Chains7.1.1. Verb-to-TAM Chains7.2. Stages of Auxiliation7.3. Sit, Stand and Lie as Aspectual Markers7.3.1. The Evolution of the Sit/Stand/Lie Aspectual Structure7.3.2. Shift from Locative to Temporal Meaning7.4. The Future: It Comes, It Goes, It Has to Be7.4.1. Pathways of Future7.4.2. From Desire to Prediction7.4.3. From Motion-in-Space to Progress-in-Time7.4.5. Obligation Futures7.5. The Case of Used to8. From Verb to Preposition8.1. Prerequisites and Conditioning Factors8.1.1. European Languages8.1.2. Serial Verb Languages8.2. Semantic, Morphological and Phonological Changes8.2.1. Between Verb and Preposition8.2.2. Coalescence and Phonological Erosion8.3. Source and Target Domains of Deverbal Prepositions9. The Evolution of Complementizers9.1. The Grammaticalization of a 'Say' Verb in Ewe9.2. Evidence from Other Languages9.3. Reanalysis at Work9.4. Universals versus Substrate10. A New Quotative Marker: English Be Like10.1. A Teenage Phenomenon?10.2. A Notoriously Polyfunctional Item10.3. Origin and Evolution of Like10.4. Subjectification11. Conclusion12. Summary (Zusammenfassung)13. Bibliography