76,99 €
versandkostenfrei*
inkl. MwSt.
Versandfertig in 6-10 Tagen
38 °P sammeln
  • Broschiertes Buch

This book provides a fresh and contemporary take on the study of men and masculinity. It highlights new and exciting approaches to sexuality, desire, men and masculinity in East Asian contexts, focusing on the interconnections between them. In doing so, it re-examines the key concepts that underpin studies of masculinity, such as homophobia, homosociality and heteronormativity. Developing new ways of thinking about masculinity in local contexts, it fills a significant lacuna in contemporary scholarship. This thought-provoking work will appeal to students and scholars of gender studies, cultural studies and the wider social sciences.…mehr

Produktbeschreibung
This book provides a fresh and contemporary take on the study of men and masculinity. It highlights new and exciting approaches to sexuality, desire, men and masculinity in East Asian contexts, focusing on the interconnections between them. In doing so, it re-examines the key concepts that underpin studies of masculinity, such as homophobia, homosociality and heteronormativity. Developing new ways of thinking about masculinity in local contexts, it fills a significant lacuna in contemporary scholarship. This thought-provoking work will appeal to students and scholars of gender studies, cultural studies and the wider social sciences.

Autorenporträt
Xiaodong Lin is a Lecturer in Sociology at the Department of Sociology, University of York, UK. Chris Haywood is a Senior Lecturer in Media and Cultural Studies at Newcastle University, UK. Mairtin Mac an Ghaill is a Professor at Newman University, UK.
Rezensionen
"The overall volume provides a strong sense that changing economic, political and cultural conditions in East Asia have been distilled through aspects of men's experiences that are personal, emotional, erotic and changeable, and ambivalent to some of the analytic frames commonly used in scholarship to consider gender. ... the volume lays important groundwork for further examining East Asian men's experiences in closer relation to the local and indigenous traditions of self-making that characterise East Asian history." (Philip Martin, NORMA, August, 2017)