Anthropogenic Tropical Forests
115,99 €
versandkostenfrei*

inkl. MwSt.
Sofort lieferbar
58 °P sammeln
  • Gebundenes Buch

The studies in this volume provide an ethnography of a plantation frontier in central Sarawak, Malaysian Borneo. Drawing on the expertise of both natural scientists and social scientists, the key focus is the process of commodification of nature that has turned the local landscape into anthropogenic tropical forests. Analysing the transformation of the space of mixed landscapes and multiethnic communities-driven by trade in forest products, logging and the cultivation of oil palm-the contributors explore the changing nature of the environment, multispecies interactions, and the metabolism…mehr

Produktbeschreibung
The studies in this volume provide an ethnography of a plantation frontier in central Sarawak, Malaysian Borneo. Drawing on the expertise of both natural scientists and social scientists, the key focus is the process of commodification of nature that has turned the local landscape into anthropogenic tropical forests. Analysing the transformation of the space of mixed landscapes and multiethnic communities-driven by trade in forest products, logging and the cultivation of oil palm-the contributors explore the changing nature of the environment, multispecies interactions, and the metabolism between capitalism and nature.

The project involved the collaboration of researchers specialising in anthropology, geography, Southeast Asian history, global history, area studies, political ecology, environmental economics, plant ecology, animal ecology, forest ecology, hydrology, ichthyology, geomorphology and life-cycle assessment.
  • Produktdetails
  • Advances in Asian Human-Environmental Research
  • Verlag: Springer / Springer, Berlin
  • Artikelnr. des Verlages: 978-981-13-7511-8
  • 1st ed. 2020
  • Erscheinungstermin: Januar 2020
  • Englisch
  • Abmessung: 241mm x 160mm x 42mm
  • Gewicht: 1110g
  • ISBN-13: 9789811375118
  • ISBN-10: 9811375119
  • Artikelnr.: 55357198
Autorenporträt
Noboru Ishikawa is a professor of anthropology at the Center for Southeast Asian Studies, Kyoto University, Japan. He has conducted fieldwork in Sarawak and West Kalimantan over the past two decades, exploring the construction of national space in the borderland, highland-lowland relations, commodification of natural resource and labour, and the relationship between nature and non-nature. His publications include: Between frontiers: nation and identity in a Southeast Asian borderland (2010), and the edited volumes Transborder governance of forests, rivers and seas (2010) and Flows and movements in Southeast Asia: new approaches to transnationalism (2011).

Ryoji Soda is a professor in geography at the Graduate School of Literature and Human Sciences, Osaka City University, Japan. He has conducted field research in Sarawak and other Asian countries focusing on human mobility of ethnic minorities. His recent interest is in human-nature interactions and environmental humanities. His publications include: People on the move: rural-urban interactions in Sarawak (2007); The diversity of small-scale oil palm cultivation in Sarawak, Malaysia. The Geographical Journal 182 (2015); and Culture and acceptance of disasters: supernatural factors as an explanation of riverbank erosion. Ngingit 9 (2017).

Inhaltsangabe
1 Commodification of Nature on the Plantation Frontier

Noboru Ishikawa and Ryoji Soda

Part I Landscape, Culture and History