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In the past twenty years, international criminal law has become one of the main areas of international legal scholarship and practice. Most textbooks in the field describe the evolution of international criminal tribunals, the elements of the core international crimes, the applicable modes of liability and defences, and the role of states in prosecuting international crimes. The Oxford Handbook of International Criminal Law, however, takes a theoretically informed and refreshingly critical look at the most controversial issues in international criminal law, challenging prevailing practices,…mehr

Produktbeschreibung
In the past twenty years, international criminal law has become one of the main areas of international legal scholarship and practice. Most textbooks in the field describe the evolution of international criminal tribunals, the elements of the core international crimes, the applicable modes of liability and defences, and the role of states in prosecuting international crimes. The Oxford Handbook of International Criminal Law, however, takes a theoretically informed and refreshingly critical look at the most controversial issues in international criminal law, challenging prevailing practices, orthodoxies, and received wisdoms. Some of the contributions to the Handbook come from scholars within the field, but many come from outside of international criminal law, or indeed from outside law itself. The chapters are grounded in history, geography, philosophy, and international relations. The result is a Handbook that expands the discipline and should fundamentally alter how international criminal law is understood.

Dieser Download kann aus rechtlichen Gründen nur mit Rechnungsadresse in A, B, BG, CY, CZ, D, DK, EW, E, FIN, F, GR, HR, H, IRL, I, LT, L, LR, M, NL, PL, P, R, S, SLO, SK ausgeliefert werden.

  • Produktdetails
  • Verlag: Oxford University Press
  • Seitenzahl: 896
  • Erscheinungstermin: 24. Februar 2020
  • Englisch
  • ISBN-13: 9780192558886
  • Artikelnr.: 58724810
Autorenporträt
Kevin Jon Heller is currently Associate Professor of Public International Law at the University of Amsterdam and Professor of Law at the Australian National University. He holds a PhD in law from Leiden University, a JD with distinction from Stanford Law School, an MA with honours in literature from Duke University, and an MA and BA in sociology, both with honours, from the New School for Social Research. His research interests focus on international criminal law and international humanitarian law, with a particular emphasis on the methodologies employed by those fields. His books include The Nuremberg Military Tribunals and the Origins of International Criminal Law (Oxford University Press, 2011); The Hidden Histories of War Crimes Trials (Oxford University Press, 2013) (edited with Gerry Simpson); and The Handbook of Comparative Criminal Law (Stanford University Press, 2011) (edited with Markus Dubber). Frédéric Mégret is a Professor at the Faculty of Law, McGill University and the holder of the Canada Research Chair in the Law of Human Rights and Legal Pluralism. He holds an LlB from King's College London, a DEA from the Université de Paris I, and a PhD from the Graduate Institute of International Studies (Geneva), as well as a diploma from Sciences Po Paris where he graduated "avec les félicitations du jury". He worked for the International Committee of the Red Cross, was a member of the French delegation at the Rome Conference on the International Criminal Court, and advised the Liberian government on a procedure to vet its armed forces for human rights violations. He is the author of "Le tribunal pénal international pour le Rwanda", and is co-editor with Philip Alston of the forthcoming second edition of The United Nations and Human Rights (OUP). Sarah Nouwen is a Reader in International Law at the University of Cambridge, Co-Deputy Director of the Lauterpacht Centre for International Law and a Fellow of Pembroke College. Her research interests lie at the intersections of law & politics, war & peace and justice & the rule of law. She is the author of Complementarity in the Line of Fire: The Catalysing Effect of the International Criminal Court in Uganda and Sudan (Cambridge University Press, 2013), an empirical study into the effects of the complementarity principle in the Rome Statute on the legal systems in Uganda and Sudan. She has advised the Netherlands Ministry of Foreign Affairs, the Department for International Development and several NGOs. She also assisted an ICC judge as a Visiting Professional. In 2010-2011 she was seconded as Senior Legal Advisor to the African Union High-Level Implementation Panel on Sudan. Jens David Ohlin is Vice Dean and Professor of Law at Cornell Law School. He specializes in international law and all aspects of criminal law, including domestic, comparative, and international criminal law. Ohlin's research also focuses on the laws of war, in particular the impact of new technology on the regulation of warfare, including remotely piloted drones and the strategy of targeted killings, cyber-warfare, and the role of non-state actors in armed conflicts. His books in this area include Targeted Killings: Law and Morality in an Asymmetrical World (OUP 2012, with A. Altman & C. Finkelstein); Cyber War: Law & Ethics for Virtual Conflicts (OUP 2015, with C. Finkelstein & K. Govern); Necessity in International Law (OUP 2016, with Larry May); and Defending Humanity: When Force is Justified and Why (OUP 2008, with George Fletcher). Darryl Robinson is Associate Professor at Queen's University Faculty of Law (Canada). He was a Hauser Scholar at New York University School of Law and a Gold Medallist at the Western University Faculty of Law. After clerking at the Supreme Court of Canada, he served as an international lawyer at Foreign Affairs Canada (1997-2004) and at the International Criminal Court (2004-2006). His research focuses on refining rules for a fair, humanistic, and inclusive system of international justice. He is a co-author of Introduction to International Criminal Law and Procedure (Cambridge University Press, 2019, with Robert Cryer et al), and is the 2013-14 recipient of the Antonio Cassese Prize for International Criminal Legal Studies.