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This enlightening book focuses on the history of how the ethnic groups of Africa, eventually joined by white colonizers from Europe, created the seedbed for the hateful apartheid system in Southern Africa. The reader learns how apartheid began, the dehumanizing effects it had on the black population, and how it was finally abolished in its 'zero hour' in 1994. Written by historian, writer and researcher Geoffrey Hebdon, this is the second in a series that covers the experience of a British citizen who emigrated to South Africa during that era, and records in vivid detail his responses to the…mehr

Produktbeschreibung
This enlightening book focuses on the history of how the ethnic groups of Africa, eventually joined by white colonizers from Europe, created the seedbed for the hateful apartheid system in Southern Africa. The reader learns how apartheid began, the dehumanizing effects it had on the black population, and how it was finally abolished in its 'zero hour' in 1994. Written by historian, writer and researcher Geoffrey Hebdon, this is the second in a series that covers the experience of a British citizen who emigrated to South Africa during that era, and records in vivid detail his responses to the apartheid system and how South Africa and neighbouring countries evolved after apartheid was abolished. As well as the first European settlers and the white Afrikaners' attempted enslavement of the black population, the book also covers the Zulu wars, the Anglo-Boer wars and individuals who supported apartheid such as Cecil Rhodes and the whites-only National Party of South Africa. Also covered are prominent leaders of the African National Congress (ANC) and the black revolutionaries who fought against apartheid, many of whom gave their lives or served life sentences for their "struggle", including Nelson Mandela, who became South Africa's first black president after serving years in prison.
Autorenporträt
Geoffrey Hebdon was born and brought up in Lancashire, England, in the heart and region of the cotton industry. After leaving college, having studied textile engineering, he embarked on the vocation of education, including lecturing, teaching and evangelical work. He and his wife Pauline lived and served in various parts of the United Kingdom, including Scotland, Yorkshire, Cheshire, Warwickshire, Northamptonshire, Cambridgeshire, Bedfordshire and Buckinghamshire.After starting a family in the 1970s, Geoffrey and his wife decided to relocate to Southern Africa and for almost 30 years were based in Cape Town. While working in Cape Town, Geoffrey, a dedicated educationalist, along with a business partner, decided to open a private, non-profit Academy with campuses in Bellville, the northern suburbs of Cape Town and also in Central Cape Town, with plans to open a third campus in the African township of Khayelitsha in the Western Cape, to offer career training courses, including, business management, computers, travel and tourism, journalism, plus health and beauty. This private academy later expanded its scope to the more disadvantaged students of Southern and Eastern Africa, with the help of the Department of Education plus generous private subsidies and sponsorships.