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Angela Brazil (1868-1947) was the first of the British writers of "modern" School Girls' Stories genre - written from the characters' point of view. Along with her sister Amy, Angela then studied at Heatherley School of Fine Art in London. She was quite late in taking up writing, developing a strong interest in Welsh mythology, and at first wrote a few magazine articles on mythology and nature. It was possibly thanks to her sister Amy that she finally began work on a novel at the age of 35. Exceptionally with respect to many of her contemporaries writing in this vein, Brazil did not write any…mehr

Produktbeschreibung
Angela Brazil (1868-1947) was the first of the British writers of "modern" School Girls' Stories genre - written from the characters' point of view. Along with her sister Amy, Angela then studied at Heatherley School of Fine Art in London. She was quite late in taking up writing, developing a strong interest in Welsh mythology, and at first wrote a few magazine articles on mythology and nature. It was possibly thanks to her sister Amy that she finally began work on a novel at the age of 35. Exceptionally with respect to many of her contemporaries writing in this vein, Brazil did not write any books in a series - each stood on its own with different characters every time. These were considered to deal accurately and sympathetically with the highs and lows in the lives of middle-class schoolgirls, including the tangle of emotional friendships. Her works include: The New Girl at St. Chad's (1911), For the Sake of the School (1915), The Luckiest Girl in the School (1916) and The Jolliest School of All (1922).
Autorenporträt
Angela Brazil (30 November 1868 - 13 March 1947) was one of the first British writers of "modern schoolgirls' stories", written from the characters' point of view and intended primarily as entertainment rather than moral instruction. In the first half of the 20th century she published nearly 50 books of girls' fiction, the vast majority being boarding school stories. She also published numerous short stories in magazines. Her books were commercially successful, widely read by pre-adolescent girls, and influenced them. Though interest in girls' school stories waned after World War II, her books remained popular until the 1960s. They were seen as disruptive and a negative influence on moral standards by some figures in authority during the height of their popularity, and in some cases were banned, or indeed burned, by headmistresses in British girls' schools. While her stories have been much imitated in more recent decades, and many of her motifs and plot elements have since become clichés or the subject of parody, they were innovative when they first appeared. Brazil made a major contribution to changing the nature of fiction for girls. She presented a young female point of view which was active, aware of current issues and independent-minded; she recognised adolescence as a time of transition, and accepted girls as having common interests and concerns which could be shared and acted upon.