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This book examines the native Irish experience of conquest and colonisation in Ulster in the first decades of the seventeenth century. Central to this argument is that the Ulster plantation bears more comparisons to European expansion throughout the Atlantic than (as some historians have argued) the early-modern state's consolidation of control over its peripheral territories. Farrell also demonstrates that plantation Ulster did not see any significant attempt to transform the Irish culturally or economically in these years, notwithstanding the rhetoric of a 'civilising mission'. Challenging…mehr

Produktbeschreibung
This book examines the native Irish experience of conquest and colonisation in Ulster in the first decades of the seventeenth century. Central to this argument is that the Ulster plantation bears more comparisons to European expansion throughout the Atlantic than (as some historians have argued) the early-modern state's consolidation of control over its peripheral territories. Farrell also demonstrates that plantation Ulster did not see any significant attempt to transform the Irish culturally or economically in these years, notwithstanding the rhetoric of a 'civilising mission'. Challenging recent scholarship on the integrative aspects of plantation society, he argues that this emphasis obscures the antagonism which characterised relations between native and newcomer until the eve of the 1641 rising. This book is of interest not only to students of early-modern Ireland but is also a valuable contribution to the burgeoning field of Atlantic history and indeed colonial studies in general.
Autorenporträt
Gerard Farrell is a Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of History, Trinity College Dublin, Ireland, where he received his PhD. A latecomer to academia, his former incarnations include freelance writer, musician and assistant nurse.
Rezensionen
"This is an impressive and satisfying book. ... Farrell's approach has been inspired by American scholars who have shown an interest in and sensitivity to the 'Indian side' of native-colonist encounters in North America. ... He highlights many interesting parallels between the interactions between the English colonists and the native peoples of Virginia, New England and
Ulster." (Henry Jefferies, Irish Historical Studies, Vol. 43 (163), May, 2019)
"The book is intensively researched and its well-wrought argument is compelling and convincing ... this work provides an enlightening and essential new strand to the discourse of the plantation and will prove indispensable to our understanding and continuing research of the period." (James O'Neill, History Ireland, July-August, 2018)