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The original four volumes of the collected works of Frederick Douglass included a substantial number of his writings and speeches but far from all of them. At the time the first volumes of Douglass' writings and speeches were published (1950-1955), the possibilities of incorporating the other unpublished material were remote. Subsequently this became possible and the present, Supplementary Volume covering the writings of Douglass over the important period from 1844 to 1860 was produced. These pages will furnish the reader with an excellent picture of the Black communities of Cleveland,…mehr

Produktbeschreibung
The original four volumes of the collected works of Frederick Douglass included a substantial number of his writings and speeches but far from all of them. At the time the first volumes of Douglass' writings and speeches were published (1950-1955), the possibilities of incorporating the other unpublished material were remote. Subsequently this became possible and the present, Supplementary Volume covering the writings of Douglass over the important period from 1844 to 1860 was produced. These pages will furnish the reader with an excellent picture of the Black communities of Cleveland, Cincinnati, Philadelphia, Chicago, Detroit and other northern cities which Douglass visited and from which he sent penetrating dispatches to his paper. They also contain considerable evidence of the ideological debates, sometimes quite bitter, which were part of the life of these Black communities in the ante-bellum years, especially over such issues as emigration. Here, as in the previous four volumes, all of Douglass' writings and speeches are reproduced with no substantial change whatsoever; misspellings and grammatical errors have been corrected if they appeared in the printed sources and clearly were typographical mistakes. A few passages have been omitted from several of the selections to avoid repetition, but these have been properly indicated. In a few cases the only account of a Douglass speech was in the form of a digest by the reporter, and where these have been included, this has been clearly indicated.
Autorenporträt
Frederick Douglass (February 1817 - February 20, 1895) was an American social reformer, abolitionist, orator, writer, and statesman. After escaping from slavery in Maryland, he became a national leader of the abolitionist movement in Massachusetts and New York, gaining note for his oratory and incisive antislavery writings. In his time, he was described by abolitionists as a living counter-example to slaveholders' arguments that slaves lacked the intellectual capacity to function as independent American citizens. Northerners at the time found it hard to believe that such a great orator had once been a slave. Douglass described his experiences as a slave in his 1845 autobiography, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave, which became a bestseller, and was influential in promoting the cause of abolition, as was his second book, My Bondage and My Freedom. After the Civil War, Douglass remained an active campaigner against slavery and wrote his last autobiography, Life and Times of Frederick Douglass. Douglass also actively supported women's suffrage, and held several public offices. Without his approval, Douglass became the first African American nominated for Vice President of the United States as the running mate and Vice Presidential nominee of Victoria Woodhull, on the Equal Rights Party ticket.