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Martin Wight (1913-1972) was one of the most original and enigmatic international thinkers of the twentieth century. This new study, drawing upon Wright's published writings and unpublished papers, examines his work on international relations in the light of his wider thought, his religious beliefs, and his understanding of history.…mehr

Produktbeschreibung
Martin Wight (1913-1972) was one of the most original and enigmatic international thinkers of the twentieth century. This new study, drawing upon Wright's published writings and unpublished papers, examines his work on international relations in the light of his wider thought, his religious beliefs, and his understanding of history.
Autorenporträt
IAN HALL is Lecturer in the School of International Relations at the University of St. Andrews, UK.
Rezensionen
"This immensely impressive study of Martin Wight by Ian Hall has now appeared and will give all who pursue the subject, or at least acknowledge its importance, plenty to think about for many years to come." - International Affairs"Ian Hall has given us an eye-opening study of an enigmatic but indispensable thinker. The book is as comprehensive an account of Martin Wight's life as one could need, and as penetrating an analysis of his thought as one might want. An important contribution to the burgeoning history of international thought." - David Armitage, Professor of History, Harvard University"Although a central pillar of British international theory, Martin Wight nevertheless continues to be an enigma. In this erudite study, Ian Hall distances himself from the conventional labels and categories that have been assigned to Wight and presents his complex views on religion, history, the crisis of modern politics, and international relations in a refreshingly insightful and original manner. This book will be of great interest to all those who have helped to re-launch the English School as well as those who are enamored with the political thought of Martin Wight." - Brian C. Schmidt, Professor of Political Science, Carleton University