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James O'Meara's The Homo and the Negro brings a "queer eye" to the overwhelmingly "homophobic" Far Right. In his title essay, O'Meara argues that the Far Right cannot effectively defend Western civilization unless it checks its premises about homosexuality and non-sexual forms of male bonding, which are undermined not just by liberals and feminists, but also by Judeo-Christian "family values" advocates. O'Meara also uses his theory to explain the stigmatization of Western high culture as "gay" and the worship of uncultured oafs as masculine ideals. Although O'Meara grants that the "gay rights" …mehr

Produktbeschreibung
James O'Meara's The Homo and the Negro brings a "queer eye" to the overwhelmingly "homophobic" Far Right. In his title essay, O'Meara argues that the Far Right cannot effectively defend Western civilization unless it checks its premises about homosexuality and non-sexual forms of male bonding, which are undermined not just by liberals and feminists, but also by Judeo-Christian "family values" advocates. O'Meara also uses his theory to explain the stigmatization of Western high culture as "gay" and the worship of uncultured oafs as masculine ideals. Although O'Meara grants that the "gay rights" movement is largely subversive, he argues that homosexuals have traditionally played prominent roles in creating and conserving Western civilization. The Second, Embiggened edition of The Homo and the Negro collects 18 pieces on such topics as conservatism, homosexuality, race, fashion, historical preservation and gentrification, Occupy Wall Street, The Gilmore Girls, The Untouchables, The Big Chill, They Live, popular music (Heavy Metal, Black Metal, New Age, Scott Walker), and such figures as Noël Coward, Oscar Wilde, Humphrey Bogart, James Bond, Sherlock Holmes, Bruce Jenner, and Milo Yiannopoulos. The volume has also been reset for greater readability and includes a detailed index. Shaped by an eccentric, post-WWII American upbringing, James O'Meara draws upon "masculinist" writers like Hans Blüher, Alisdair Clarke, and Wulf Grimsson, as well as the Traditionalism of René Guénon, Julius Evola, and Alain Daniélou. A work of broad learning, deep insight, and stunning originality, The Homo and the Negro establishes James O'Meara as one of the most iconoclastic and courageous voices on the New Right.