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Electrical workers and their unions were at the vortex of the arguments that shook the labor movement and the country during the Cold War. This book recounts and interprets that experience. While international issues were widely considered beyond the bailiwick of workers, they split the labor movement, impacted heavily on the electrical unions, and were the subject of passionate debate among workers. Questioning the dominant assumptions of United States foreign policy from a labor standpoint required extraordinary vision and courage, but a significant body of trade unionists felt that such…mehr

Produktbeschreibung
Electrical workers and their unions were at the vortex of the arguments that shook the labor movement and the country during the Cold War. This book recounts and interprets that experience. While international issues were widely considered beyond the bailiwick of workers, they split the labor movement, impacted heavily on the electrical unions, and were the subject of passionate debate among workers. Questioning the dominant assumptions of United States foreign policy from a labor standpoint required extraordinary vision and courage, but a significant body of trade unionists felt that such questioning was simply the common-sense approach for labor leaders and unions to take.
Autorenporträt
John Bennett Sears is a retired high school history teacher living in Philadelphia. During his 36-years career with the Philadelphia School District, he was active in writing curriculum and in the American Federation of Teachers. His recently published articles include "When Your Principal Gets Called Up" which he co-authored (as Ben Sears) with colleague Jason Klugman PhD and which was included in the collection, Defeating Terrorism; Developing Dreams, volume III (Philadelphia: Chelsea House) Publishers 2004), Arthur Shostak, Ed. He holds a PhD in history from Temple University (1988).