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Eric Arthur Blair (1903¿1950), more commonly known by his pen name George Orwell, was an English journalist, essayist, critic, and novelist most famous for his novel ¿Nineteen Eighty-Four¿ (1949) and allegorical novella ¿Animal Farm¿ (1945). His work is characterised by an opposition to totalitarianism and biting social commentary, and remains influential in popular culture today. Many of his neologisms have forever entered the English language, including "Thought Police", "Big Brother", "Room 101", "doublethink", "thoughtcrime", and "Newspeak" to name but a few. As well as his fiction, he…mehr

Produktbeschreibung
Eric Arthur Blair (1903¿1950), more commonly known by his pen name George Orwell, was an English journalist, essayist, critic, and novelist most famous for his novel ¿Nineteen Eighty-Four¿ (1949) and allegorical novella ¿Animal Farm¿ (1945). His work is characterised by an opposition to totalitarianism and biting social commentary, and remains influential in popular culture today. Many of his neologisms have forever entered the English language, including "Thought Police", "Big Brother", "Room 101", "doublethink", "thoughtcrime", and "Newspeak" to name but a few. As well as his fiction, he also wrote a large number of essays on a variety of subjects including politics, literature, travel, poverty, writing, and more. Known for having a strong voice in the subject of literature, many of the best examples of which are contained within this volume. Contents include: ¿Boys' Weeklies and Frank Richards's Reply¿, ¿Charles Dickens¿, ¿Inside the Whale¿, ¿The Art of Donald McGill¿, ¿Rudyard Kipling¿, ¿W. B. Yeats¿, ¿Arthur Koestler¿, ¿Raffles and Miss Blandish¿, etc. This fantastic collection of Orwell's best essays on literature is highly recommended for all lovers of the English language and fans of one of the greatest 20th century British writers. Other notable works by this author include: ¿Burmese Days¿ (1934), ¿Keep the Aspidistra Flying¿ (1936), and ¿Coming Up for Air¿ (1939). Read & Co. Great Essays is proudly publishing this brand new collection of classic essays.
Autorenporträt
Who Was George Orwell? George Orwell was an English novelist, essayist and critic most famous for his novels 'Animal Farm' (1945) and 'Nineteen Eighty-Four' (1949). George Orwell was a novelist, essayist and critic best known for his novels Animal Farm and Nineteen Eighty-Four. He was a man of strong opinions who addressed some of the major political movements of his times, including imperialism, fascism and communism. Family & Early Life: Orwell was born Eric Arthur Blair in Motihari, India, on June 25, 1903. The son of a British civil servant, Orwell spent his first days in India, where his father was stationed. His mother brought him and his older sister, Marjorie, to England about a year after his birth and settled in Henley-on-Thames. His father stayed behind in India and rarely visited. (His younger sister, Avril, was born in 1908. Orwell didn't really know his father until he retired from the service in 1912. And even after that, the pair never formed a strong bond. He found his father to be dull and conservative. George Orwell's Most Famous Books: Sometimes called the conscience of a generation, Orwell is best known for two novels: Animal Farm and Nineteen Eighty-Four. Both books, published toward the end of Orwell's life, have been turned into films and enjoyed tremendous popularity over the years. 'Animal Farm' (1945) Animal Farm was an anti-Soviet satire in a pastoral setting featuring two pigs as its main protagonists. These pigs were said to represent Joseph Stalin and Leon Trotsky. The novel brought Orwell great acclaim and financial rewards. 'Nineteen Eighty-Four' (1949) Orwell's masterwork, Nineteen Eighty-Four (or 1984 in later editions), was published in the late stages of his battle with tuberculosis and soon before his death. This bleak vision of the world divided into three oppressive nations stirred up controversy among reviewers, who found this fictional future too despairing. In the novel, Orwell gave readers a glimpse into what would happen if the government controlled every detail of a person's life, down to their own private thoughts.