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One of the most important historical records from classical antiquity, "The Annals of Imperial Rome" chronicles the history of the Roman Empire from the reign of Tiberius beginning in 14 A.D. to the end of the reign of Nero in 68 A.D. Written by Cornelius Tacitus, a Roman Senator during the second century A.D., it is a detailed first-hand account of the early Roman Empire and an important source for a modern understanding of that time. It is believed that as a Senator, Tacitus had access to the records of the Roman Senate and thus had a very accurate basis for his history. The work begins with …mehr

Produktbeschreibung
One of the most important historical records from classical antiquity, "The Annals of Imperial Rome" chronicles the history of the Roman Empire from the reign of Tiberius beginning in 14 A.D. to the end of the reign of Nero in 68 A.D. Written by Cornelius Tacitus, a Roman Senator during the second century A.D., it is a detailed first-hand account of the early Roman Empire and an important source for a modern understanding of that time. It is believed that as a Senator, Tacitus had access to the records of the Roman Senate and thus had a very accurate basis for his history. The work begins with the death of Caesar in 14 A.D. and in brutal and unflinching detail Tacitus describes the decadence and corruption of the Roman Emperors, as well as the equally corrupt Senatorial aristocracy, who Tacitus saw as being too servile to the Emperors. The reigns of Tiberius, Claudius, and Nero were a fascinating and bloody time, full of violence, treasonous plots, murders, suicides, and uprisings. Included are vivid descriptions of the great fire of Rome, the persecution of the Christians, and the suppression of the revolt in Britain led by Boudicca. Presented in this volume is the classic translation of Alfred John Church and William Jackson Brodribb. This edition is printed on premium acid-free paper.
Autorenporträt
Publius Cornelius Tacitus (c.¿AD 56 - c.¿120) was a senator and a historian of the Roman Empire. Tacitus is considered to be one of the greatest Roman historians. He lived in what has been called the Silver Age of Latin literature, and is known for the brevity and compactness of his Latin prose, as well as for his penetrating insights into the psychology of power politics. As a young man, Tacitus studied rhetoric in Rome to prepare for a career in law and politics; like Pliny, he may have studied under Quintilian (c.¿35 AD - c.¿ 100). In 77 or 78, he married Julia Agricola, daughter of the famous general Agricola. Little is known of their domestic life, save that Tacitus loved hunting and the outdoors. He started his career under Vespasian (69-79), but entered political life as a quaestor in 81 or 82 under Titus. He advanced steadily through the cursus honorum, becoming praetor in 88 and a quindecimvir, a member of the priestly college in charge of the Sibylline Books and the Secular games. He gained acclaim as a lawyer and as an orator. From his seat in the Senate, Titus became suffect consul in 97 during the reign of Nerva, being the first of his family to do so. During his tenure, he reached the height of his fame as an orator when he delivered the funeral oration for the famous veteran soldier Lucius Verginius Rufus. In the following year, he wrote and published the Agricola and Germania, foreshadowing the literary endeavors that would occupy him until his death. Afterwards, he absented himself from public life, but returned during Trajan's reign (98-117). In 100, he and his friend Pliny the Younger prosecuted Marius Priscus (proconsul of Africa) for corruption. Priscus was found guilty and sent into exile; Pliny wrote a few days later that Tacitus had spoken "with all the majesty which characterizes his usual style of oratory."