Silas Marner - Eliot, George
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Purchase one of 1st World Library's Classic Books and help support our free internet library of downloadable eBooks. Visit us online at www.1stWorldLibrary.ORG - - In the days when the spinning-wheels hummed busily in the farmhouses - and even great ladies, clothed in silk and thread-lace, had their toy spinning-wheels of polished oak - there might be seen in districts far away among the lanes, or deep in the bosom of the hills, certain pallid undersized men, who, by the side of the brawny country-folk, looked like the remnants of a disinherited race. The shepherd's dog barked fiercely when…mehr

Produktbeschreibung
Purchase one of 1st World Library's Classic Books and help support our free internet library of downloadable eBooks. Visit us online at www.1stWorldLibrary.ORG - - In the days when the spinning-wheels hummed busily in the farmhouses - and even great ladies, clothed in silk and thread-lace, had their toy spinning-wheels of polished oak - there might be seen in districts far away among the lanes, or deep in the bosom of the hills, certain pallid undersized men, who, by the side of the brawny country-folk, looked like the remnants of a disinherited race. The shepherd's dog barked fiercely when one of these alien-looking men appeared on the upland, dark against the early winter sunset; for what dog likes a figure bent under a heavy bag? - and these pale men rarely stirred abroad without that mysterious burden. The shepherd himself, though he had good reason to believe that the bag held nothing but flaxen thread, or else the long rolls of strong linen spun from that thread, was not quite sure that this trade of weaving, indispensable though it was, could be carried on entirely without the help of the Evil One. In that far-off time superstition clung easily round every person or thing that was at all unwonted, or even intermittent and occasional merely, like the visits of the pedlar or the knife-grinder. No one knew where wandering men had their homes or their origin; and how was a man to be explained unless you at least knew somebody who knew his father and mother? To the peasants of old times, the world outside their own direct experience was a region of vagueness and mystery: to their untravelled thought a state of wandering was a conception as dim as the winter life of the swallows that came back with the spring; and even a settler, if he came from distant parts, hardly ever ceased to be viewed with a remnant of distrust, which would have prevented any surprise if a long course of inoffensive conduct on his part had ended in the commission of a crime; especially if he had any reputation for knowledge, or showed any skill in handicraft. All cleverness, whether in the rapid use of that difficult instrument the tongue, or in some other art unfamiliar to villagers, was in itself suspicious: honest folk, born and bred in a visible manner, were mostly not overwise or clever - at least, not beyond such a matter as knowing the signs of the weather; and the process by which rapidity and dexterity of any kind were acquired was so wholly hidden, that they partook of the nature of conjuring. In this way it came to pass that those scattered linen-weavers - emigrants from the town into the country - were to the last regarded as aliens by their rustic neighbours, and usually contracted the eccentric habits which belong to a state of loneliness.
  • Produktdetails
  • Verlag: 1st World Library - Literary Society
  • Seitenzahl: 264
  • Erscheinungstermin: 1. September 2004
  • Englisch
  • Abmessung: 216mm x 140mm x 15mm
  • Gewicht: 377g
  • ISBN-13: 9781595404282
  • ISBN-10: 1595404287
  • Artikelnr.: 22260996
Autorenporträt
Mary Ann Evans (22 November 1819 - 22 December 1880; alternatively Mary Anne or Marian), known by her pen name George Eliot, was an English novelist, poet, journalist, translator and one of the leading writers of the Victorian era. She wrote seven novels, Adam Bede (1859), The Mill on the Floss (1860), Silas Marner (1861), Romola (1862-63), Felix Holt, the Radical (1866), Middlemarch (1871-72) and Daniel Deronda (1876), most of which are set in provincial England and known for their realism and psychological insight. Although female authors were published under their own names during her lifetime, she wanted to escape the stereotype of women's writing being limited to lighthearted romances. She also wanted to have her fiction judged separately from her already extensive and widely known work as an editor and critic. Another factor in her use of a pen name may have been a desire to shield her private life from public scrutiny, thus avoiding the scandal that would have arisen because of her relationship with the married George Henry Lewes. Middlemarch has been described by the novelists Martin Amis and Julian Barnes[4] as the greatest novel in the English language.
Rezensionen

Süddeutsche Zeitung - Rezension
Süddeutsche Zeitung | Besprechung von 05.11.2019

NEUE TASCHENBÜCHER
Leim und Liebe – George Eliots
bewegender Roman „Silas Marner“
Es ist, als drehten Mühlräder sich im Kopf von Mr. Macey, dem Küster des englischen Dorfes Raveloe. Da erzählt er von einer Hochzeit, der Männerrunde im Wirtshaus Rainbow, wo allabendlich die kleinsten Probleme besprochen werden und auch ein paar gewichtige, ohne dass es einen Unterschied gäbe dazwischen oder einen Übergang. Die Mühlsteine setzten sich in Bewegung nach einem Lapsus des Pfarrers bei einer Hochzeit: „Willst du diesen Mann zu deinem rechtmäßig angetrauten Eheweib nehmen?“, hatte er gefragt, und darauf fragte sich Mr. Macey, ob diese Trauung denn nun gültig sei. Was der Leim sei, der eine Ehe zusammenhält: „Macht’s jetzt der Sinn oder machen’s die Worte, dass zwei Leute verheiratet sind?“ Sein und Schein, innere und äußere Beziehung: dörfliche Debattenkultur Mitte des 19. Jahrhunderts.
Dann aber tritt Silas Marner in die Wirtsstube, und der hat ein schreckliches Problem, sein Geld ist weg, das er zusammensparte in jahrelanger Arbeit. Silas Marner ist ein Außenseiter, ein Loser, in seiner Jugend wurde er verjagt aus der Kirche vom Lantern Yard – ein falscher Verdacht, der Verrat eines Freundes, Verbitterung, Einsamkeit. Nur die zwei Beutel Goldguineen sind ihm Lebensinhalt.
Die Geschichte des Silas Marner ist ein großer intimer Roman der Erzählerin George Eliot – am 22. November ist ihr 200. Geburtstag –, bodenständig, ohne Pathos und Larmoyanz erzählt, mit Lust an Verzettelung im Detail, die ganz natürlich ins Komische wechselt. Manchmal erlebt Silas Marner Momente der Geistesabwesenheit, in denen aber Entscheidendes passiert – der „Zauberstab der Katalepsie“, moderne Form der Fatalität. Ein zweijähriges mutterloses Mädchen taucht bei ihm auf, dem er Vater werden kann, das, anstelle der Guineen, nun Mittelpunkt seines Lebens ist.
Was die Heirat des Mr. Macey angeht: Unsinn, hat später in der Sakristei der Pfarrer gesagt, „es kommt weder auf den Sinn an noch auf die Worte – es kommt aufs Heiratsregister an – das ist der Leim“. FRITZ GÖTTLER
George Eliot: Silas Marner. Der Weber von Raveloe. Roman. Aus dem Englischen von Elke Link und Sabine Roth. dtv, München 2019. 239 Seiten, 11,90 Euro.
DIZdigital: Alle Rechte vorbehalten – Süddeutsche Zeitung GmbH, München
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