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"Mr Wodehouse's idyllic world can never stale. He will continue to release future generations from captivity that may be more irksome than our own. He has made a world for us to live in and delight in." -Evelyn Waugh "Wodehouse is one of the funniest and most productive men who ever wrote in English. He is far from being a mere jokesmith: he is an authentic craftsman, a wit and humorist of the first water, the inventor of a prose style which is a kind of comic poetry." -Richard Voorhees First published in 1923, The Inimitable Jeeves follows young Bertie Wooster as he complicates every attempt…mehr

Produktbeschreibung
"Mr Wodehouse's idyllic world can never stale. He will continue to release future generations from captivity that may be more irksome than our own. He has made a world for us to live in and delight in." -Evelyn Waugh "Wodehouse is one of the funniest and most productive men who ever wrote in English. He is far from being a mere jokesmith: he is an authentic craftsman, a wit and humorist of the first water, the inventor of a prose style which is a kind of comic poetry." -Richard Voorhees First published in 1923, The Inimitable Jeeves follows young Bertie Wooster as he complicates every attempt to aid the easily confused Bingo Little's pursuit of true love. Disaster surely awaits, unless they can trust in the intervention of Bertie's serenely competent valet, Jeeves. The Inimitable Jeeves is a chain of short stories masterfully fused into a novel and one of the best-known books about the author's most famous characters, Bertie Wooster and Jeeves. Well meaning, but often clueless, man-about-town Bertie narrates his adventures with assorted friends and relatives. These deal primarily with his chum Bingo Little's astounding ability to fall instantly and randomly in love and then conceive of startlingly absurd methods of getting himself into his beloved's good graces. Wodehouse's joyous farce showcases his trademark vision of a timeless and comfortable England, a collection of generally less-than-perceptive characters, and most especially his sublime prose- deadpan, precise and ceaselessly inventive. The author's vision and style have proven uniquely his own, resist any attempt at imitation and will continue to offer readers entrance into a world of charm and urbane hilarity. With an eye-catching new cover, and professionally typeset manuscript, this edition of The Inimitable Jeeves is both modern and readable. The Inimitable Jeeves by P.G. Wodehouse chronicles the divinely hapless Bertie Wooster's attempts to assist a friend in matters of the heart, inevitably resulting in socially awkward and potentially calamitous difficulties that can only be solved by the smooth skills of his valet, Jeeves. A classic of polished prose and distinctly British humor.
Autorenporträt
Sir Pelham Grenville Wodehouse (15 October 1881 - 14 February 1975) was an English author and one of the most widely read humorists of the 20th century. Born in Guildford, the third son of a British magistrate based in Hong Kong, Wodehouse spent happy teenage years at Dulwich College, to which he remained devoted all his life. After leaving school he was employed by a bank but disliked the work and turned to writing in his spare time. His early novels were mostly school stories, but he later switched to comic fiction, creating several regular characters who became familiar to the public over the years. They include the feather-brained Bertie Wooster and his sagacious valet, Jeeves; the immaculate and loquacious Psmith; Lord Emsworth and the Blandings Castle set; the Oldest Member, with stories about golf; and Mr Mulliner, with tall tales on subjects ranging from bibulous bishops to megalomaniac movie moguls. Most of Wodehouse's fiction is set in England, although he spent much of his life in the US and used New York and Hollywood as settings for some of his novels and short stories. He wrote a series of Broadway musical comedies during and after the First World War, together with Guy Bolton and Jerome Kern, that played an important part in the development of the American musical. He began the 1930s writing for MGM in Hollywood. In a 1931 interview, his naïve revelations of incompetence and extravagance in the studios caused a furore. In the same decade, his literary career reached a new peak. In 1934 Wodehouse moved to France for tax reasons; in 1940 he was taken prisoner at Le Touquet by the invading Germans and interned for nearly a year. After his release he made six broadcasts from German radio in Berlin to the US, which had not yet entered the war. The talks were comic and apolitical, but his broadcasting over enemy radio prompted anger and strident controversy in Britain, and a threat of prosecution. Wodehouse never returned to England. From 1947 until his death he lived in the US, taking dual British-American citizenship in 1955. He was a prolific writer throughout his life, publishing more than ninety books, forty plays, two hundred short stories and other writings between 1902 and 1974. He died in 1975, at the age of 93, in Southampton, New York