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'H. G. Wells and All Things Russian' is a fertile terrain for research and discussion and this volume will be the first to devote itself entirely to the theme. Wells was an astute student of Russian literature, culture and history, and Russians, in turn, became eager students of Wells's views and works (Yuly Kagarlitsky, a Soviet biographer of Wells, called him 'a one-man think tank'). During the Soviet years, in fact, no 'big' foreign author was safer for Soviet critics to praise than H. G. Wells. The reason was obvious. He had met - and approved of - Lenin, was a close friend of the Soviet…mehr

Produktbeschreibung
'H. G. Wells and All Things Russian' is a fertile terrain for research and discussion and this volume will be the first to devote itself entirely to the theme. Wells was an astute student of Russian literature, culture and history, and Russians, in turn, became eager students of Wells's views and works (Yuly Kagarlitsky, a Soviet biographer of Wells, called him 'a one-man think tank'). During the Soviet years, in fact, no 'big' foreign author was safer for Soviet critics to praise than H. G. Wells. The reason was obvious. He had met - and approved of - Lenin, was a close friend of the Soviet literary giant Maxim Gorky and, in general, expressed much respect for Russia's evolving Communist experiment, even after it fell into Stalin's hands. Wells's views on the Soviet Union were often more complex than Soviet critics gave him credit for, but their whitewashing only served to secure his position as a sympathetic man of letters from the capitalist world. On the other hand, those who discerned his nuanced position towards totalitarian regimes, including the dystopian writer Evgeny Zamyatin, the author of an early Soviet study of Wells, found him to be a soulmate and an influence of a different kind, which worked to increase the English author's popularity among those segments of the Russian reading public for whom his relationships with Lenin and Gorky meant very little.