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"Evgeny Boratynsky and the Russian Golden Age" is the first metrical and rhymed translation of nearly all the lyrics by Evgeny Boratynsky (1800-1844), one of the greatest poets of the Golden Age of Russian poetry. Also included is the translation of two narrative poems ("Banqueting" and "Eda") and the most characteristic passages from "The Gypsy" and "The Ball." Each work is followed by a full annotation, in which, in addition to the background necessary for the understanding of the work, one finds an analysis of its form. In many cases, the poems on similar themes by Pushkin, Lermontov,…mehr

Produktbeschreibung
"Evgeny Boratynsky and the Russian Golden Age" is the first metrical and rhymed translation of nearly all the lyrics by Evgeny Boratynsky (1800-1844), one of the greatest poets of the Golden Age of Russian poetry. Also included is the translation of two narrative poems ("Banqueting" and "Eda") and the most characteristic passages from "The Gypsy" and "The Ball." Each work is followed by a full annotation, in which, in addition to the background necessary for the understanding of the work, one finds an analysis of its form. In many cases, the poems on similar themes by Pushkin, Lermontov, Tyutchev Yazykov and some later poets are included. In its entirety, the commentary provides a glimpse into Boratynsky's literary epoch, his ties with his environment (Russian, French and German), and the influence he exercised on later poets. A special feature of "Evgeny Boratynsky and the Russian Golden Age" is the translator's strict adherence to the form of the original. In all cases, Anatoly Liberman attempts to reproduce not only the rhyming and the metrical scheme of the poems but also the sound effects and some of the special features of Boratynsky's vocabulary, while remaining as close to the poet's wording as possible. The few previous attempts to present Boratynsky's mastery to the English-speaking world were less ambitious and considerably more limited in scope. A long introduction provides the expected biographical information and acquaints the reader with the poetic climate of the Golden Age and with the history of translating Boratynsky into English.